Council
New Society leadership: See President Tim Daley QC’s inaugural address on YouTube

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The Nova Scotia Barristers’ Society is pleased to introduce its new leadership for the coming year. Timothy G.J. Daley QC of New Glasgow assumed the position of President for 2012-2013 during the Society’s 2012 Annual Meeting. Joining him as Officers are First Vice-President René Gallant and Second Vice-President Tilly Pillay QC, both of Halifax.

In his inaugural address, Mr. Daley outlined his priorities as President for the year ahead. Watch his address on the Society’s new YouTube channel, either in full or in segments.

“It’s a full agenda,” Mr. Daley told the 200 lawyers who attended the Annual Meeting, held June 16 at Schulich School of Law. “Council has a lot on its plate this year, a lot of significant challenges, but it’s going to rise to those challenges.”

The ongoing examination of rural and small practice issues for lawyers – and public access to legal services in non-urban areas – will remain a high priority for the new Council and its Rural Practice Working Group, Mr. Daley said.

Nova Scotia’s legal profession must also engage in a serious discussion about how the profession is changing, he said, pointing to the fundamental shifts already underway in other jurisdictions such as England and Australia. As he travels around the province this year, he encourages lawyers to “begin to think about how we can get ahead of the tsunami of change in self-regulation, change in business structures and particularly, change in the ways in which legal services are going to be delivered in the future,” he said.

Darrel Pink, Executive Director, gave a detailed presentation on these changes during the Annual Meeting, titled “The Revolution in Legal Services Delivery”. The text and slides are available for viewing on the Society’s website, and the video will soon be available. See the Recent presentations page at http://nsbs.org/recent-presentations.      

In his address, Mr. Daley also shared personal reflections on the value of the Nova Scotia Lawyers Assistance Program, which provided crucial support for him at an earlier time in his career.

“Someone suggested I call the LAP. That service literally, literally saved my life,” he recalled.

He encouraged more people to use the confidential referral and short-term counselling service at 1 866 299 1299 and www.nslap.ca. Resources are available for free by phone and online for lawyers and their families, as well as lawyers’ staff and their families, for a full range of personal, family or life events, as well as health and wellness issues.

Looking at the statistics and the complaints received by the Society, a number of lawyers are obviously struggling, Mr. Daley said. “If you think somebody needs help, reach out to them or call and ask the LAP to help … what we don’t want to have happen is that the train wreck arrives at the door of professional responsibility.”

Following the Annual Meeting, the Schulich School of Law provided a two-hour professional development program, which counted toward the Society’s new CPD requirement. Sessions addressed cultural competence, developments in evidence law, the first six months of the Code of Professional Conduct, and claim prevention tips from LIANS.