INFORUM

May 31, 2018 InForum Issue

Society news

At its meeting on April 27, Council approved the Society’s Operating and Capital Budgets for 2018-2019, and set the fees necessary for the membership year beginning July 1, 2018. Invoices and notices of Preauthorized Payment amounts will be sent to lawyers and firms in early May. The 2018-19 SCHEDULE A: Society Fees and Assessments, with full details for 2018-2019, is now available on the website.

The Practising Fees required to balance the Society’s operating budget would be $2,477 (17-18 $2,627), but a fee credit of $77 (17-18 $220) (paid from Lawyers’ Fund for Client Compensation [LFCC] reserves) will be applied, bringing the net Practising Fee to $2,400 plus HST (17-18 $2,607). This is a reduction in the net Practising Fee from the previous year.

The special assessment levied for the previous year has allowed the Society to replenish operating reserves to an appropriate level and therefore, no assessment is required for 2018/19.

Non-Practising Fees for 2018-19:

  • Non-practising members: $300 + HST (no change from 17-18)
  • Retired members: $50 + HST (no change from 17-18)

Budget highlights

The budget for 2018-19 reflects the Society’s continued focus on meeting its Regulatory Objectives and a “Triple-P” (proactive, principled and proportionate) approach to legal services support and regulation. Following a significant organizational redesign during the 2017-18 fiscal year, the budget includes resources focused on building internal knowledge and expertise within the Society. This year represents the second year of a multi-year budgeting approach, which focuses on the strategic directions set by Council and attempts to increase transparency in decision making and planning.

As part of its budget process, the Society has also created a one-page summary to provide a snapshot of fee history over the past few years.

LIANS

For the Lawyers’ Insurance Association of Nova Scotia (LIANS), the full cost of insurance would be $2,256 (17-18 $2,119) but a credit of $261 (17-18 $244) reduces the net amount to $1,995 (17-18 $1,875) for lawyers in private practice. This translates to $998 (17-18 $938) for lawyers practising with the Nova Scotia Legal Aid Commission and Dalhousie Legal Aid Service, and $350 (17-18 $350) for lawyers employed in the civil service of the Province of Nova Scotia[1].

PAYMENT OPTIONS

Credit card payments

Practising lawyers are able pay the full amount of the Practising Fee by June 30 by credit card, provided they pay an administrative fee of $80 plus HST ($60 to NSBS; $20 to LIANS). This can be paid through the Member Login area of the NSBS website or by contacting reception at the Society’s offices.

Monthly payment plan option

For those who choose the Preauthorized Payment (PAP) Plan option for fees, the first draw on June 20, 2018 will be for two months and an administrative charge (total $934.38). Each additional monthly payment of ($421.19) will be drawn on the 20th of each month with last payment on April 20, 2019. (No payment during May 2019.) Please note that in order to be considered for PAP, all new requests must be received by the office prior to June 18 for processing. Lawyers already set up on PAP do not need to reapply.

If you have any questions, please contact Sean Walker, Director, Finance & Administration, at 902 422 1491 or swalker@nsbs.org.


[1] For lawyers employed in the civil service of the Province of Nova Scotia and not including members employed by provincial government agencies, commissions or corporations, or employed as counsel for municipalities within the province.

The Society is planning to modernize the Trust Assurance Program over the next six to nine months and is looking to form a working group that will help guide the planning and decision making.

The revised program will aid in the achievement of the following:

  • reduce the regulatory burden on lawyers (through technology and innovation) while increasing compliance;
  • reduce the complaints/claims received by the Society with respect to trust accounts (volume and/or complexity);
  • enhance the risk management practices surrounding trust accounts (using Triple-P methodology); and
  • enhance access to justice by providing education, resources, tools and increased flexibility for lawyers, with a goal of making it easier to understand and comply with trust account “rules” (using Triple-P methodology).

The working group will work with the Society on reviewing a number of areas related to the Trust Assurance Program (below) to achieve the results listed above:  

  • the trust regulations (including rules regarding restriction on use of trust account, materiality of balances, reporting timelines, reporting of overdrafts, client ID, etc.);
  • the Trust Account Report (TAR) and the Accountants’ Review of Trust Accounts (ARTAR) as they relate to the regulations;
  • the trust assurance risk assessment process; and
  • education and communication of changes with the profession.

If you would like to express interest in participating in the working group, please contact Sean Walker, Director, Finance & Administration, swalker@nsbs.org 902-422-1491 x314 by June 30. The initial plan is to have the group meet approximately once per month (two hour meetings) between July and December 2018.

The Society wishes to advise members of the recent death of the following colleague. We extend our condolences to his friends and family.

  • Wylie Spicer QC, Calgary – May 21, 2018 Obituary

A former law professor and Managing Partner of McInnis Cooper, Mr. Spicer’s legal practice focused in marine law and related areas. He was a dedicated lawyer, mentor and volunteer, who served on NSBS Council and was a past president of CBA-Nova Scotia.

Mr. Spicer acted as Counsel to the Royal Commission on the Donald Marshall, Jr. Prosecution. The work of that Commission helped to shine a light on systemic racism and led to significant changes in Nova Scotia’s justice system. He shared these memorable reflections in a special edition of The Society Record in 2009, twenty years after the Marshall Inquiry.

Also see: In Memoriam: Former professor and alumnus Wylie Spicer (LLB '75); Schulich School of Law (May 24, 2018)

The following media reports were published since the last edition of InForum:

Allnovascotia.com (content available by subscription only)

  • Lawyers Must Make Succession Plans (May 29)
  • Bar Society Hiring Lawyer & Paralegal (May 28)
  • Bar Society Resumes Duane Rhyno Hearing (May 24)
  • Colpitts Seeks Leniency (May 22)
  • Lyle Howe Granted Final Extension (May 11)
  • NS Lawyers See Bar Fees Drop (May 8)
  • Lyle Howe Appeal (May 7) 
Council

For details about matters discussed at Council's meeting on Friday, May 18, the Council Highlights and Documents are now available on the Council materials page of the Society's website: http://nsbs.org/council-materials.

The next meeting of Council is the 2018 NSBS Annual Meeting and Professional Development Program on Saturday, June 16 at the Schulich School of Law, starting at 8:30 am. The next regular meeting of Council is scheduled for Friday, July 20, 2018 at the Society’s offices at 9:00 am.

Regulation

Succession planning requirement

At its meeting on May 18, 2018, Council adopted a regulatory amendment that will require lawyers and law firms to maintain written succession plans. This obligation is now included in subregulations 4.6.1 (law firms) and 4.6.2 (sole practitioners), and subregulations 4.6.4 through 4.6.6 provide a framework for the development of a succession plan. This came about as a result of work done by the Succession Planning Working Group[1].

While these regulations do create a mandatory obligation to have a written succession plan, the specifics of any lawyer’s plan will need to be tailored to address that lawyer’s unique practice type. Over the coming months, the Society will be working with lawyers and law firms to develop the necessary templates to support the development of practice appropriate plans.

The Society will be preparing guidance materials that will be made available to the membership in support of these regulatory amendments. Currently, materials relating to the preparation of succession plans can be found on the Lawyers’ Insurance Association of Nova Scotia’s website, in the Succession Planning section of the Practice Management resources.


[1] In 2017, the Succession Planning Working Group (the Working Group) was struck to consider whether mandatory succession planning should be required for lawyers who deliver legal services to the public. Council created the Working Group because it recognized that one of the major challenges for Nova Scotia lawyers, and one of the significant regulatory risks for the Society, relates to succession planning (or the lack thereof).  Over the last several years, the Society has experienced increasing costs associated with assisting lawyers at the end of their careers who have not made adequate plans for the transition of their practices when they are no longer capable of dealing with them because of disability, incapacity or death.

The Working Group’s final report recommended that the Society should, as part of Legal Services Support, develop, maintain and promote resources to assist lawyers and law firms in preparing for succession or wind-up of practices at the end of a career. As well, Council should consider enacting a regulation that requires all law firms delivering legal services to the public to have a succession plan and to advise the Executive Director of its location.

In March 2018, Council determined that the Regulations made pursuant to the Legal Profession Act should be amended to include a requirement for lawyers and law firms to develop and maintain succession plans for all lawyers associated with the firm. Tied to this amendment will be the need for the Society to develop guidance materials and resources for lawyers to assist them with their compliance with this new regulatory obligation as part of our Legal Services Support model.

The Real Estate Standards Committee is seeking input from the membership on revisions to the following real estate standards:

Please submit comments and suggestions pertaining to these standards to info@lians.ca by June 29th, 2018.

Credentials

This feature is available in every edition of InForum, for timely updates on changes of category.

The following members have changed to the Practising Lawyer category:

Clare Elizabeth Bilek
Simon Zachary Hodge
Daphne Clara Mary Ann Williamson

The following members have changed to Non-Practising status:

David Alexander Burton
Maria Margaret Conroy
Matthew Alexander Edmonds
Catherine Jean Logan
Anne E. McFarlane
Andrew Neil Montgomery
Amy Catherine Smeltzer

The following members have changed to Retired status:

Nicholas Ann Dorrance
Janice M. Forsyth
Cyril Randall
David Raymond Thomas
Valerie C. Vaughan-Hines

The following member has resigned: 

Natascha Marie Johanne Joncas

Professional development

BANKRUPTCY

  • THE 2018 ANNOTATED BANKRUPTCY AND INSOLVENCY ACT / Houlden, Lloyd W; Morawetz, Geoffrey B; Sarra, Janis P — Toronto: Carswell Thomson Reuters, 2018. [KB 113 H838 2018]

COMMERCIAL LAW

  • CANADIAN BUSINESS LAW / Alexander, Tamra; Papadeas, Pat — 3d ed. — Toronto: Emond Publishing, 2018. [KB 115 A374 2018]

CONTRACTS

  • THE CONTRACTS HANDBOOK : A PRACTICAL GUIDE TO REVIEWING, REVISING, AND NEGOTIATING COMMERCIAL CONTRACTS / Kerr, Margaret — Toronto: Emond Publishing, 2018. [KB 130 K41 2018]

INSURANCE

  • INSURANCE CASE LAW DIGEST : PROPERTY AND CASUALTY / Newcombe, John; Petrie, Bruce — Toronto: LexisNexis Canada, 1985. [KB 140 N539 1985]

LABOUR LAW

  • THE LAW OF WORK : COMPETE EDITION / Doorey, David J — Toronto: Emond Publishing, 2017. [KB 60 D691C 2017]

Canadian Bar Association announcement – May 11, 2018

Open research is gradually reshaping the way that researchers collaborate to advance knowledge and discovery. Now, as part of its mandate to foster dialogue and collaboration between legal scholars and practitioners, the CBA’s bilingual peer-reviewed legal journal, The Canadian Bar Review, has gone open access

The move to an open access platform is also in keeping with the CBA’s commitment to advancing access to justice and the advancement of the law.

The country’s top legal minds can now publish their articles in a timely manner and even use the new platform’s automated submission process. Readers will have easier access to the publication and be able to effortlessly share its contents.

Founded in 1923, the Canadian Bar Review is edited by Law Dean Chris Waters, and criminal law professor David M. Tanovich, both from the Faculty of Law at the University of Windsor, and by Patrice Deslauriers, professor in the Faculty of Law at the Université de Montréal.

To get a sense of the new platform, visit the most recent edition, published April 16, 2018.  It explores a range of issues from Canada’s "institutional turn" in religious freedom litigation to data on defamation law in Canada, and the outsourcing of legal services. Here are a few examples of articles in the current edition:

  • The Transformative Potential of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission: A Skeptic’s Perspective; by Michael Coyle
  • Lawyers and Self-Represented Litigants: An Ethical Change of Role?; by Jennifer A. Leitch
  • Ethical Duties of Lawyers for Parents Regarding Children of Clients: Being a Child-focused Family Lawyer; by Nicholas Bala, Patricia Hebert, Rachel Birnbaum

Further reading:

The Canadian Bar Review is now open access
CBA National | May 24, 2018 | BY YVES FAGUY

Access to Justice

May 22, 2018 – A new guide for lawyers working with Indigenous People was unveiled at a special event at Osgoode Hall in Toronto on May 22. The Guide for Lawyers Working with Indigenous People aims to provide a deeper understanding and a more meaningful inclusion of Indigenous Peoples in the legal process.

Developed by The Advocates’ Society, the Indigenous Bar Association and the Law Society of Ontario, the guide was produced in response to the Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) of Canada, released in 2015. The TRC report included 94 calls to action. Specifically, call 27 was directed at the legal community, calling on it to:

Ensure that lawyers receive appropriate cultural competency training, which includes the history and legacy of residential schools, the United Nations Declaration on Rights of Indigenous People, Treaties and Aboriginal rights, Indigenous law, and Aboriginal-Crown relations. This will require skills-based training in intercultural competency, conflict resolution, human rights, and anti-racism.

“We want to thank all those involved in the Guide’s development and review,” said Scott Robertson, President of the Indigenous Bar Association. “The consultations undertaken on the guide with a broad cross-section of members of the bar, bench, academia, community workers and Elders, helped immensely in putting together what we hope will be a useful resource.”

The goal of the guide is to provide a better understanding of the histories, cultures, laws, including spiritual laws, and legal orders of Indigenous Peoples. The guide also provides practical tools to help lawyers represent Indigenous clients as effectively as possible, and resources for lawyers to continue their education and improve their services to clients and others.

Read more in the May 22 announcement.

Tips from LIANS

Within the last year, several firms across Canada fell victim to one of the bank transfer-type scams that we’ve reported on in recent years, all suffering significant debits to their trust accounts. Numerous Nova Scotia lawyers and/or their staff have received the same type of “spoofing” email scam attempt (emails that falsely appear to be sent from an individual’s email account). Unlike the typical financial scams where a client seeks to debit your trust account with a bogus cheque, this scam targets a lawyer or staff person who will receive an email appearing to be from a colleague who is out of the office, requesting assistance in making a payment or wire transfer to a domestic or international financial institution. The colleague’s name will appear in the “From:” line of the email, which leads the person in the office to falsely believe they are communicating with their colleague. One example of the message is as follows:

[Employee name],

Please let me know if you're available to process a Bank Transfer or E-Transfer, because i'll be very busy today(this is an outgoing payment). And also, what is the information you need to process it?

Thanks,
[Lawyer name]

Sent from my iPhone

If you or your staff have received a similar email, change your email passwords immediately in order to reduce the risk of being “spoofed” again. These emails will be looking to either transfer money directly from one account to another, or to intercept and obtain sensitive banking information that can be used to steal money from your accounts.

Remember, if you receive an unusual and unsolicited email that appears to be from a party you know, confirm their request by sending a new email (not by directly replying to the email in question).

For tips to avoid being victimized, visit the Fraud section on lians.ca. To report or seek advice on dealing with fraud and scam attempts, contact Cynthia Nield at cnield@lians.ca or 902 423 1300, x346.

The latest issue of Vitality Newsletter offers "The many faces of PTSD". This edition provides examples of symptoms an individual can experience when suffering from PTSD; the factors that help minimize symptoms, and a personal journey of someone who overcame this disorder.

This resource is provided through your Nova Scotia Lawyers Assistance Program (NSLAP) provider, Homewood Health™.

Visit the NSLAP website at www.nslap.ca. For more information and support with PTSD, along with resources and counselling to improve your health and wellness, register with Homewood Health™ https://www.homeweb.ca. Please note that NSLAP is your “company” name when you register.

Call in confidence, 24 hours a day: 1 866 299 1299 (within Nova Scotia) | (See the website for details about calling from outside Nova Scotia) | 1 866 398 9505 (en français) | 1 888 384 1152 (TTY).

 

Courts

J. Michael MacDonald

May 4, 2018 – The Honourable J. Michael MacDonald, Chief Justice of the Nova Scotia Court of Appeal and the 22nd Chief Justice of Nova Scotia, has announced that he will retire from the Bench, effective February 1, 2019.

Born and raised in Whitney Pier, N.S., Chief Justice MacDonald received his B.A. at Mount Allison University and his LL.B. at Dalhousie University. He was called to the Nova Scotia Bar in 1979 and went on to practise with Boudreau, Beaton & LaFosse in Sydney, where he also served as President of the Cape Breton Barristers’ Society. He later joined Stewart McKelvey Stirling Scales in Halifax and sat on various committees with the Nova Scotia Barristers’ Society.

He was appointed a judge of the Nova Scotia Supreme Court in 1995 and an Associate Chief Justice of that Court three years later. He became Chief Justice of Nova Scotia in 2004 and is currently the Chief Justice of the Nova Scotia Court of Appeal.

A member of the Canadian Judicial Council for close to 20 years, Chief Justice MacDonald has chaired several of its committees and presently chairs the Judicial Conduct Committee. For the past four years, he has also served alongside the provincial Minister of Justice on Nova Scotia’s Access to Justice Coordinating Committee.

The May 4 announcement triggers the selection process to appoint Nova Scotia’s next Chief Justice, an appointment made by the federal Cabinet based on recommendations from the Prime Minister of Canada.

The Nova Scotia Courts are planning a refresh of their website and want to hear from you on how to make it better!

Please follow this link to a short survey: https://surveys.gov.ns.ca/TakeSurvey.aspx?SurveyID=m61I5730#

The survey closes on June 5. 

May 4, 2018 – The Provincial Court has issued a new Practice Directive to help counsel identify and manage complex cases: http://www.courts.ns.ca/Provincial_Court/NSPC_criminal_rules_forms.htm

The Nova Scotia Courts have announced the venue and scope of the fatality inquiry into the deaths of veteran Lionel Desmond and his family. For details, see the May 24 media advisory from the Executive Office of the Nova Scotia Judiciary.

OTTAWA – The Honourable Jody Wilson-Raybould, Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada, announced on May 4 that Alexandra Steele, a lawyer with ROBIC LLP, is appointed a prothonotary of the Federal Court, effective May 15, 2018. She replaces Prothonotary Richard Morneau, who has elected to retire effective May 15, 2018. Read more in the Department of Justice (Canada) News Release

***

Le gouvernement du Canada annonce la nomination d’une protonotaire de la Cour fédérale

OTTAWA - L'honorable Jody Wilson-Raybould, ministre de la Justice et procureur général du Canada, a annoncé le 4 mai qu’Alexandra Steele, avocate au sein du cabinet ROBIC s.e.n.c.r.l., est nommée protonotaire de la Cour fédérale à compter du 15 mai 2018. Elle remplace monsieur le protonotaire Richard Morneau, qui a choisi de prendre sa retraite le 15 mai 2018. Communiqué de presse du Ministère de la Justice (Canada)

Province

People are invited to provide input into the province's plan for an accessible Nova Scotia at engagement sessions taking place up to June 4 in various communities.

"We have set a goal of becoming an accessible province by 2030," Mark Furey Minister responsible for the Accessibility Act, said in a May 7 announcement. "This is an ambitious and important goal and it will take all of us working together to achieve it."

"I encourage everyone to provide input into this work so that we can identify and remove barriers and create a province that is accessible to all." 

Sessions were scheduled for Yarmouth, Bridgewater, Dartmouth, Kentville, Stellarton and Sydney. All facilities are accessible and CART and ASL interpretation services will be provided.

Those who are unable to attend a session can provide written feedback to the accessibility directorate at accessibility@novascotia.ca.    

Government will release its accessibility strategy this fall. The strategy will outline priorities, timelines and actions for accessibility standards in education, employment, the built environment, the delivery of goods and services, information and communication and transportation. 

The strategy will be developed based on what is heard at the consultations, from ongoing discussions with persons with disabilities, businesses, municipalities, post-secondary institutions and from jurisdictional research.

For more information on accessibility, or to review a copy of the consultation backgrounder, visit https://novascotia.ca/accessibility/consultation.

Further reading:

Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal, May 11, 2018  

May 11 announcement

Government is planning to replace the Motor Vehicle Act with a new Traffic Safety Act. Nova Scotians have a chance to provide feedback.

One of the first areas being updated are rules of the road, including distracted driving, speed limits and bicycling.

“Nova Scotians are on our roads every day and we want to hear what they have to say as we develop the new act and regulations,” Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal Minister Lloyd Hines said in a May 11 announcement. “The existing act was written in the early 1900s and we need to modernize our laws. We want the new act to be more flexible and responsive.”

The new act, expected to be introduced in the Nova Scotia legislature this fall, governs and regulates the registration and identification of motor vehicles and the use of provincial highways and roads. This includes driver’s licences, the registration and inspection of vehicles, traffic laws and equipment standards.

For more information and to provide feedback, visit http://novascotia.ca/trafficsafetyact/.

The deadline for feedback is Friday, June 8.

Written submissions can be sent to:

Traffic Safety Act Engagement/Policy and Planning
Department of Transportation & Infrastructure Renewal
P.O. Box 186
Halifax, NS B3J 2N2

Premier Stephen McNeil has proclaimed the International Decade for People of African Descent in Nova Scotia.

"Today, as government, we are reaffirming our commitment to take action to ensure all Nova Scotians are treated with dignity, equality and respect while having equitable access to opportunities in our province,"  Premier McNeil said in a May 8 announcement.

"I've said many times that Nova Scotians deserve to see themselves reflected in our institutions. We will continue working to make that a reality as we strive to be a leader in addressing systemic racism and discrimination, and ensure this is a province where no citizen is judged or held back because of who they are."

The United Nations declared 2015-2024 as the International Decade for People of African Descent to strengthen global co-operation in support of people of African descent so they can enjoy social, cultural, political and civil rights for full inclusion in all aspects of society. The theme is recognition, justice and development.

"I am proud to stand here today, as the minister representing African Nova Scotians, to say we stand committed to responding to the United Nations' call to work towards ensuring the full inclusion of people of African descent," said Tony Ince, Minister of African Nova Scotian Affairs. "As the birthplace of African Canadian heritage, Nova Scotia should play a leadership role in bringing people together to ensure all Nova Scotians are treated with dignity and respect while having equitable access to the opportunities our province has to offer.

"Today, as we proclaim the decade, we are taking another step forward to celebrate and acknowledge the people who helped shape our province."

The Government of Nova Scotia, led by the Office of African Nova Scotian Affairs, is developing an action plan for the decade to further advance government's work in addressing systemic racism and discrimination. The action plan will be launched later this year.

The 2018-19 provincial budget committed an additional $710,000 to African Nova Scotia Affairs to help the office expand its important work and to support the decade action plan. A significant portion of the new funding - $500,000 - will be spent directly in communities on programming and services. The funding will also be used to create two new Community Outreach positions.

"This event, and recognition, acknowledges the years of racism that persons of African descent have endured in Nova Scotia," said Robert Ffrench, executive director at the Valley African Nova Scotian Development Association. "This proclamation sends a clear message that Nova Scotia is open to all people and our challenge is not only based in the past, but how we proceed moving forward together."

To learn more about the decade visit http://www.un.org/en/events/africandescentdecade/

Department of Justice, May 16, 2018 – Survivors of sexual assault will have access to 11 more lawyers providing free, independent legal advice.

A federal-provincial pilot project gives assault survivors up to four hours of free legal advice. Eleven lawyers from across the province are being added, for a total of 19 lawyers providing advice.

“Survivors of sexual assault need support,” Justice Minister and Attorney General Mark Furey said in a May 16 announcement. “By expanding the program, we’re ensuring individuals have better access to the important advice they need, and from someone they feel comfortable working with.”

The expanded coverage also includes enhanced diversity, with lawyers from the Cantonese, LGBTQI+, Indigenous and African Nova Scotian communities. The lawyers are from Sydney (2), Port Hawkesbury, Truro, Chester and Halifax (6). All have received specialized training.

Since the program launched in November 2017, 71 individuals have signed up to access the free legal advice.

211 Nova Scotia, operating independently from government, provides intake, information and administration of the certificates for the program and helps clients access these legal services.

Nova Scotia has been working on several initiatives to respond to the needs of survivors of sexual assault. They include:

  • hiring two special prosecutors in the Public Prosecution Service who are dedicated to sexual assault cases
  • conducting police audits to ensure police have the appropriate capability to investigate sexual assaults
  • launching the domestic violence court in Halifax Regional Municipality

For more information on the program, visit http://www.novascotia.ca/sexualassaultlegaladvice.

Includes chapters on Maintenance Enforcement Program and Correctional Facilities

Auditor General Michael Pickup issued his 2018 performance audit report on May 29. The report contains three chapters of audit results:

  • Chapter one: Grant Programs
  • Chapter two: Correctional Facilities
  • Chapter three: Maintenance Enforcement Program

The report contains a total of 24 recommendations, which have all been accepted by government. For a more detailed summary, see the May 29 news release from the Office of the Auditor General.

The full report, along with a short summary and two-minute video for each of the three chapters, is available at www.oag-ns.ca.

The following proclamations were published in the Royal Gazette, Part II since the last issue of InForum:

An Act to Amend Chapter 436 of the Revised Statutes, 1989, the Solemnization of Marriage Act,  S.N.S. 2017, c. 15, s. 25
NS Gaz Pt 2, 05/11/2018
NS Reg 73/2018

This notice has been prepared by Society staff in Library & Information Services.

Data from 2016-17 has been added to the Financial Condition Index, which provides financial information about Nova Scotia's municipalities.

The index is at https://novascotia.ca/dma/finance/indicators.asp.

The findings of the three-year review of the Personal Health Information Act were tabled with the House of Assembly on Wednesday, May 30.

The report is available on the Department of Health and Wellness website at novascotia.ca/dhw/publications.asp.

News releases from the provincial government are available at this link, and are searchable by department and date: novascotia.ca/news/

The following announcements since the last edition of InForum may be of interest to the legal profession; see link above for all provincial releases:   

JUSTICE: Find all DOJ announcements at novascotia.ca/just/communications/

  • AccessAbility Week Promotes Inclusion and the Removal of Barriers to Accessibility; an op-ed by Gerry Post, Executive Director of the Nova Scotia Accessibility Directorate (May 30)
  • Correctional Services Week Recognized (May 17)
  • Fentanyl Seized at Central Nova Scotia Correctional Facility (May 8)
  • Chief Medical Officer, Public Safety Director Carfentanil Update (May 2)
  • Additional Cannabis Retail Locations Announced (May 1)

SERVICE NOVA SCOTIA: Find all news releases at novascotia.ca/sns/

  • New Licence Plate Celebrates Nova Scotia's Gaelic Heritage (May 10)

AFRICAN NOVA SCOTIAN AFFAIRS--Nova Scotia Proclaims the International Decade for People of African Descent (May 8)

AUDITOR GENERAL--Performance Audit Report Released )May 29)

COMMUNITIES/CULTURE/HERITAGE

  • Nova Scotia Museum Celebrates 150 Years of Telling Nova Scotians' Stories (May 18)
  • Nova Scotia Heads to Asia for Province's First Culture Export Mission (May 9) 

COMMUNITY SERVICES

  • More Day Programs for Nova Scotians with Disabilities (May 16)
  • Government Invests in Community Projects to Reduce Poverty (May 1)  

COVE--First Tenants Announced for New Ocean Hub (May 3)

EDUCATION/EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT

  • New Inclusive Education Supports for Students (May 8)
  • Council Invests in More Teachers (May 8) 
  • School Capital Plan Released (April 30)

ENVIRONMENT

  • Nova Scotia Joins Western Climate Initiative Inc. (May 14)
  • Boat Harbour Cleanup Project to Undergo Class II Environmental Assessment (April 27)

HEALTH/WELLNESS

  • Emergency Health Services Employees Recognized for Decades of Service (May 29)
  • High-dose Flu Vaccine Available in Long-Term Care Facilities (May 17)
  • Physicians Take Advantage of Incentives (May 2)

HOUSING NOVA SCOTIA

  • Applications Open to First-time Homeowners (May 31)
  • Victims of Domestic Violence in Cumberland County Have a New Place to Call Home (May 11)

HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION

  • Y.Z. v. Halifax Regional Municipality Remedy Hearing (May 29)
  • MacLean, Livingstone, Delaney and Disability Rights Coalition of Nova Scotia v. Province of Nova Scotia Hearing Resumes (May 29)

IMMIGRATION--High Interest in Nova Scotia from International Doctors (May 3)

INTERNAL SERVICES--Interim Update on FOIPOP Portal Privacy Breach (April 30)                   

INVEST NOVA SCOTIA--Support for Clean Solution (May 17)

LABOUR/ADVANCED EDUCATION

  • Apprenticeship Program Trains 16 People in Mi'kmaw Communities (May 25)
  • Nova Scotians Honour Workers and Families on Day of Mourning (April 27) 

LABOUR RELATIONS

Health Care Council of Unions Ratifies Mediation-Arbitration Agreement (May 18)

MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS--Applications Available for Emergency Services Provider Fund (May 7)

NATURAL RESOURCES

  • Biodiversity Council Members Appointed (May 22)
  • Independent Review of Forest Practices Being Finalized (April 30) 

NOVA SCOTIA BUSINESS INC.--New Awards Format for Export Awards Celebrates Businesses of All Shapes and Size (May 25)

N.S. SECURITIES COMMISSION

  • Investor Alert for ORCA and BIOK (May 22)
  • Investor Alert for 1st Trade Options/First Trade Options (May 2)

PREMIER'S OFFICE

  • Premier Announces June 19 Byelection in Cumberland South (May 17) 
  • Premier in Toronto to Promote Investment Opportunities in Nova Scotia (May 17)
  • Province Expands Youth Initiatives (May 10)
  • Halifax Wins Bid to Host the 2020 North American Indigenous Games (May 3)
  • Premier's Mission to France, Germany, England
Other news

May 22, 2018 – Ottawa, Ontario – Department of Justice Canada 

Putting children’s best interests first: Creating a more efficient and effective family justice system

Protecting families, particularly children, from the negative outcomes often related to separation and divorce is a priority for the Government of Canada. Canada’s family justice system must work for families and be both accessible and efficient.

On May 22, the Honourable Jody Wilson-Raybould, Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada, introduced legislation that would help achieve these objectives by amending three federal family laws: the Divorce Act, the Family Orders and Agreements Enforcement Assistance Act (FOAEAA) and the Garnishment, Attachment and Pension Diversion Act (GAPDA). This is the first substantial update of Canada’s federal family laws in 20 years.

The bill’s four key objectives are to promote the best interests of the child, address family violence, help reduce child poverty, and make Canada’s family justice system more accessible and efficient.

Other proposed amendments would streamline certain family justice processes, encourage people to resolve divorce-related disputes out of court, and create new rules for parents who wish to relocate a child after a divorce. Proposed amendments to FOAEAA and GAPDA would provide additional tools for enforcing family support obligations.

As announced in Budget 2018, the Government also proposes to improve access to the family justice system by expanding unified family courts in Alberta, Ontario, Nova Scotia, and Newfoundland and Labrador. Unified family courts also provide services in all areas of Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, Manitoba, and Saskatchewan. Unified family courts simplify procedures by allowing federal and provincial family law issues to be addressed by a single court. Read more in the May 22 news release.

Other news from Justice Canada

On May 29, 2018, the Nova Scotia Legal Aid Commission released its 2018-2019 Business Plan, which can be found on its website: NS Legal Aid Commission 2018-2019 Business Plan.

The Business Plan can also be found in Legal Aid Publications under the About Us tab.

Sydney Sheriff Services in partnership with Cape Breton Regional Police Service, Scotiabank, Sobeys and the Canadian Cancer Society are having our 6th Annual Cops Against Cancer Auction. We are looking for donations from businesses to help us raise money for this worthwhile cause.

All funds received from this auction will be given to the Canadian Cancer Society to be allocated to local kids who are dealing with cancer. Our goal is to allow them to partake in Camp Goodtime, a camp dedicated to children with this illness. As always, any donation would be greatly appreciated.

The auction will take place at the Joan Harriss Cruise Pavilion, Sydney Waterfront, on Sunday, June 10, 2018 starting at noon. Last year we raised just over $13,000 to help send kids to camp! Find out more about Cops Against Cancer

For further information, or if you have a donation, please contact:

  • Deputy Kurt Gilbert, Sheriff Services at 902-565-4668
  • Deputy Peter Smits, Sheriff Services at 902-577-4563 

The family of Diane Dorothy Muttart is seeking to locate her Last Will and Testament. Mrs. Muttart was born on December 16, 1946, and passed away on April 22, 2018. She formerly resided at 131 Farnham Gate Road, Unit 4, 3rd Floor, in Halifax, and passed away at Northwood Manor in Halifax. She was predeceased by her husband, Mr. Wayne Muttart.

Lawyers with any information about the preparation or location of a Will for Mrs. Muttart are asked to contact Tanya Butler at 902-491-4227 or tbutler@coxandpalmer.com.

Seeking missing will for Robert Allan Smith, born February 27, 1937, age 81. Date of death was April 5, 2018. Both his will and his wife's (Alice Elizabeth Smith, who was named as his executor) were prepared when they resided in the Dartmouth area (Lynn Drive) in April 1973, by Waterfield and Waterfield of Dartmouth, .

Please contact his daughter, Paula Wood paulawood@bellaliant.net or by telephone 902-430-7452.

 

Careers

Power, Leefe, Reddy & Rafuse is currently seeking to fill a one-year maternity leave position for the approximate period July 2018 to July 2019. This would be a Monday to Friday 9-5 position. The responsibilities would include: answer the phone, taking messages, opening mail and distributing mail, meeting and greeting clients, maintaining the photocopier, checking faxes and distribution, banking and errands. Applicant must have a valid driver's licence and vehicle. (job description available upon request).

Please apply in confidence to gail@lawpower.ca

I am currently enrolled at the University of New Brunswick Law School pursuing my Juris Doctor with an expected graduation in 2019. I have completed my second year this April and have moved back to Nova Scotia until school resumes in September, 2018. My long term goal is to return to Nova Scotia and pursue a career in my home province.

I am now very anxious to find work in a law office at this point of my education and am willing to accept any position available.

My detailed resume is available upon request.

Jesse Charles MacLean

902-759-5582

jessemaclean94@hotmail.com

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

PUBLIC TRUSTEE, PUBLIC AND OFFICIAL GUARDIAN

JUSTICE & PUBLIC SAFETY

LOCATION – CHARLOTTETOWN

FULL-TIME EXCLUDED POSITION (Commencing Immediately)

Reporting to the Director of Family Law and Court Services, the primary purpose of the Public Trustee, Public and Official Guardian is to act on  behalf of medically assessed, incompetent persons who are unable to manage their own affairs. This includes the power to make financial, legal, medical, and educational and other personal decisions on behalf of clients. The position is accountable for the administration of the estates of minors, deceased persons and missing persons as well as independent oversight in court settlement matters for minors and persons under disability.  

Duties will include:

  • Acting as the manager of the Office of the Public Trustee, Public and Official Guardian Section within the Family Law and Court Services Division, including staffing, evaluating employee performance and maintaining section budgets;
  • Holding statutory appointments as Public Guardian, Public Trustee and Official Guardian;
  • Acting as the principal decision maker on asset management with the Public Trustee’s Office, including property, investments and personal property;
  • Assisting individuals who are unable to look after their financial affairs as Committee, a power or attorney, or estate administrator in accordance with legislation and policy that impacts the Office;
  • Maintaining client assets in excess of $9 million, held in trust;
  • Attending Supreme Court as an Applicant or Defendant in order to ensure that the rights of Public Trustee clients are appropriately represented. 
  • Acting as the principal decision maker on Guardianship files and being on call to address emergent issues relating to client decisions;
  • Reviewing legal and medical documents to determine whether a client should come under the care of the Public Guardians;
  • Making health treatment decisions on behalf of persons in accordance with Consent to Treatment and Health Care Directives Act;
  • Providing legal information on services relating to the Public Guardian to the local bar and judiciary, the court and client families;
  • Acting as litigation guardian of minors and other persons when required to do so under the Act and the Rules of Court;
  • Other duties as required.

Minimum Qualifications:

  • A law degree and be a member, or eligible for membership, with the Prince Edward Island Bar Law Society supplemented by extensive experience as a practicing lawyer;
  • Considerable experience in laws that relate to functions carried out by the Public Trustee, Public Guardian and Official Guardian and in a client facing litigation environment;
  • Considerable supervisory experience;
  • Excellent writing and analytical skills; proficiency in word processing and spreadsheets; 
  • Ability to interpret and apply provisions of complex legislation;
  • Strong investigative skills, time management and organizational skills;
  • Flexibility to manage a broad range of tasks is essential;           
  • Must be comfortable preparing and making presentations to groups;      
  • A proven ability to develop good working relations with external organizations and agencies;
  • A proven ability to work independently and manage a high volume, complex case load;
  • A proven ability to develop policy and procedures and undertake ongoing review to ensure operational and legal validity of office policies;
  • The successful applicant must provide a satisfactory criminal records check and vulnerable sector check prior to beginning employment;
  • The successful applicant may be required to obtain a Level II Security Clearance.

Please Note: Please ensure the application clearly demonstrates how you meet the noted qualifications as applicants will be screened based on the information provided. The successful candidate will be the only individual receiving written notification of competition results. The "Notification of Successful Candidates" list posted on the Employment Opportunity board will serve to inform all other applicants of competition results.

Salary Range:               $51.27 - $64.10 per hour (Level 26 Excluded)

Bi-Weekly Hours:       75.0 hours bi-weekly

Posting ID:                    132950-0418JPPI

Closing Date:                Monday, May 14, 2018    5:00 p.m.

Please return forms to PEI Public Service Commission, P.O. Box 2000, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, C1A 7N8.Applications may be sent by fax to (902) 368-4383. IT IS THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE APPLICANT TO CONFIRM RECEIPT OF THE APPLICATION, BY TELEPHONE OR IN PERSON PRIOR TO THE CLOSING DATE. Please ensure that the appropriate Posting ID number is stated on all application forms.¿ You can apply online or obtain an application form by visiting our web site at www.gov.pe.ca/jobs.Forms may also be obtained by contacting any PEI Government office, ACCESS PEI Centre, Regional Services Centre, or by telephone 368-4080.

The East Coast Environmental Law Association (ECELAW) is seeking a motivated individual with strong legal research skills and an interest in environmental law to join our team as an Articled Clerk from June 2018 – June 2019.  

ECELAW is an environmental law charity. From our offices in Halifax, we work throughout Atlantic Canada to secure a clean, healthy environment through public legal education, community collaboration, and legal action.   

ECELAW works to make environmental laws and legal options easy to understand for Atlantic Canadians who are fighting for environmental and climate justice. We collaborate with local, regional, and national groups to strengthen and improve environmental laws and to ensure those laws are upheld, and we provide direct support to individuals, organizations, and communities that seek to defend our environment through law and legal action.  

ECELAW provides environmental law information, education, and research to Atlantic Canadians by working with law students, hosting community workshops and legal clinics, responding to legal inquiries from the public, and publishing open-access reports and relevant case summaries on our website.  

As ECELAW’s Articled Clerk, you will: 

  • be exposed to and carry out research on diverse environmental law issues, some of which may include marine and aquaculture regulations, federal and provincial environmental assessment processes, environmental rights, local resource extraction, climate change, freedom of information, and legislative review;
  • play an active role in developing and maintaining collaborative relationships with environmental organizations, government actors, and community stakeholders throughout Atlantic Canada;
  • supervise law students who work with ECELAW as volunteers;
  • gain valuable insight into the daily management of a legal non-profit;
  • contribute to access to justice;
  • join a small but committed team, where your contributions will make a lasting impact.

In the past, ECELAW’s Articled Clerk has contributed to projects such as a FOIPOP appeal and the presentation of oral submissions to the federal Standing Committee on Fisheries and Oceans. 

ECELAW’s Articled Clerkship is a shared articling arrangement, and the successful candidate for this position will split their time equally between ECELAW and McKiggan Hebert Lawyers: a personal injury law firm with an office in downtown Halifax. By working with McKiggan Hebert, you will: 

  • be exposed to additional areas of law, including personal injury law, medical malpractice, employment disputes, commercial transactions, and Aboriginal and Indigenous law;
  • conduct client intakes, develop relationships with clients, identify legal issues, and advise clients on their legal options;
  • draft legal documents and materials, including briefs, motions, affidavits, and legal correspondence;
  • be responsible for overseeing legal claims and managing files to their resolution;
  • attend court and advocate on behalf of clients, including at discoveries, settlement conferences, small claims court, trial, or settlement negotiations;
  • be part of a dynamic legal team and learn about the daily management of a small law firm.

To apply for this position, please send a cover letter and resume to admin@ecelaw.ca

Application materials may be addressed to:

Lisa Mitchell, Executive Director

East Coast Environmental Law Association

6061 University Ave., PO Box 15000

Halifax, NS  B3H 4R2 

The application deadline is May 18, 2018.

TD Insurance Staff Legal is expanding its Halifax Legal Office and adding to its current compliment of over 50 lawyers nationwide.  Reporting to the AVP Claims Litigation & SIU, the lawyer will handle assigned P&C insurance legal matters and represent TD Insurance or its policyholders in civil litigation matters involving claims for damages related to personal injury and property claims.  

Main Responsibilities:

  • Uses Litigation Protocols to develop and revise appropriate legal strategy for discovery, investigation, and trial/hearing of cases; advises, communicates and develops litigation strategies with TD Insurance Claims Representatives and insured clients, as appropriate.
  • Conducts appropriate discovery, and with appropriate senior counsel supervision conducts hearings, trials, oral arguments, mediations, arbitrations and similar proceedings. Researches the law applicable to cases. Drafts legal documents, pleadings, motions, legal factums and opinions as required. Conducts settlement negotiations, as directed.
  • Advises, communicates and confers with Claims Representatives and insured clients rendering clear, well-researched and unambiguous legal opinions and advice. Personally meets with, and maintains good relations and communications with Claims Representatives and insured clients as required.
  • Remains current with developments in the law, and understands medical, scientific, construction, products, engineering or similar issues and defences involved with P&C cases.
  • Meets with TD Insurance personnel to provide updates on developments in jurisprudence and legislation.

Job Requirements

  • Completion of law school with LLB or JD, and admission to the bar in Nova Scotia or eligible for admission to the bar in Nova Scotia.
  • Two or more years post-call experience, preferably in litigation and /or insurance defence.
  • Some courtroom experience.
  • Knowledge of legal and court documents and procedures.
  • Knowledge of standard office equipment and word processing.
  • Excellent oral and written advocacy and communication skills.
  • Ability to communicate effectively with policyholders, claims personnel and judges/adjudicators.
  • Motivated self-starter with capability to work productively and independently under pressure.
  • Strong interpersonal and client service skills, and professional and positive demeanour.
  • Superior organizational and priority-setting skills, strong work ethic and ability to multi-task productively.
  • Conceptual and creative problem solving skills.

Additional Information Flexible work schedules available.  We thank all interested parties but not all applicants will be contacted for interviews.

Inclusiveness At TD, we are committed to fostering an inclusive, accessible environment, where all employees and customers feel valued, respected and supported. We are dedicated to building a workforce that reflects the diversity of our customers and communities in which we live and serve. If you require an accommodation for the recruitment/interview process (including alternate formats of materials, or accessible meeting rooms or other accommodation), please let us know and we will work with you to meet your needs.

If you are Interested In this opportunity please apply directly through the TD Opportunities website  https://jobs.td.com/en-CA/jobs/7975479/insurance-lawyer-halifax-ca/ 

Please also feel free to contact Thomas Hudak directly (Claims Litigation & SIU I TD Insurance) Thomas.Hudak@td.com

Competition # 12741 

Director, Legal Services, Permanent, HALIFAX  

Justice  

Posting Closing Date: 5/28/2018  

Our goal is to be a diverse workforce that is representative, at all job levels, of the citizens we serve.  The Government of Nova Scotia has an Employment Equity Policy and we welcome applications from Aboriginal People, African Nova Scotians and Other Racially Visible Persons, Persons with Disabilities and Women in occupations or positions where they are under-represented.  If you are a member of one of the equity groups, you are encouraged to self-identify, on your application form, cover letter, or on your resume.

Division Overview

The Legal Services Division, Department of Justice is the government’s law firm, providing a full range of legal advice and services to support government operations and help government achieve its corporate priorities. With a staff of over 150 lawyers, paralegals, researchers and administrative professionals, the Division is one of the largest law offices in the Province and is responsive to its clients’ needs. Operating within government, the Division adds value to the services and advice it provides because it understands the corporate environment in which government operates. 

The Division has extensive experience with legal issues that uniquely affect the Crown and offers a full range of  legal advice to government departments and agencies and represents government in civil legal proceedings before all levels of courts, bodies and tribunals, and in arbitrations and mediations.

Duties

This position works collaboratively with the Executive Director, other Divisional Directors and Team Leads as a senior management team within the Legal Services Division. The Director is accountable to develop clear objectives and deliver results in a fiscally responsible manner.  In doing so, the incumbent exercises strong leadership skills, provides strategic direction and energizes individuals on the team to strive towards excellence in the provision of legal services.  The Director sets appropriate expectations and standards to ensure the effective and efficient delivery of legal services and is responsible for managing the Division collectively with the senior management team. 

The Director is required to make decisions based on the analysis of information presented, sometimes in the face of ambiguous or conflicting situations.  They are therefore required to put systems in place to proactively monitor risk and determine acceptable risk tolerances. 

The Director is required to provide strategic, effective and efficient counsel and advocacy to senior management in other Departments and to the Deputy Minister of Justice.  The incumbent works horizontally across government using a systems-thinking approach and is a creative problem solver who can develop innovative solutions to complex problems and relationships.

Qualifications

The Director, Legal Services will be an individual with strong interpersonal and communication who is comfortable making strategic decisions in ambiguous situations.   As the successful candidate, you will need to be able to demonstrate the following:

  • Eligibility to practice law in Nova Scotia with a minimum of 10 years’ legal experience and significant management experience.
  • A comprehensive understanding of Crown law.
  • Outstanding written and verbal communication and influencing skills
  • An ability to build effective new relationships across government and utilize existing networks in a political or complex environment.
  • The ability to solve complex problems using innovative solutions.
  • The ability to embrace change and create a clear compelling vision of the purpose of the change for others.
  • Experience leading and managing a team of professionals, including facilitating development opportunities and succession planning.
  • The ability to promote an organizational perspective and leverage limited resources for the benefit of the organization.

Civil litigation experience will be considered an asset.

Competencies

  • Decisiveness
  • Strategic Orientation
  • Team Leadership
  • Self-Awareness & Personal Impact
  • Partnering & Relationship Building
  • Intercultural Diversity Proficiency
  • Effective Interactive Communication
  • Change Leadership

 Pay Grade:  MCL 32  

Salary Range:  $3,838.00 - $6,093.00 Bi-Weekly  

We thank all applicants for their interest, however, only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

Offer of employment is conditional upon the completion of all applicable background checks and confirmation of credentials, the results of which must be satisfactory to the employer. 

For questions or concerns, please contact Competitions@novascotia.ca

One of Halifax's leading law firms, Burchells LLP, is currently recruiting for a full-time associate lawyer to work in the Aboriginal Law Group to start immediately. 

Burchells LLP has the region's largest Aboriginal Law practice, providing legal advice to Aboriginal Peoples in various parts of Canada since 1985.  We provide a wide range of legal services on behalf of First Nations, Tribal Councils, Indigenous Rights organizations and indigenous businesses.

The successful candidate will have a minimum of two years of experience and be able to produce work collegially in a demanding and fast paced work environment.  Prior experience in Aboriginal Law is considered an asset.

Burchells offers a competitive salary and full comprehensive benefit package.

Please visit our website www.burchells.ca to learn more about our firm.

Application review begins as applications are received. Position will remain open until filled.

Interested applicants should submit their curriculum vitae and cover letter in confidence to:

Charlene F. Harrison
Office Manager
charrison@burchells.ca

Wilson Fuel Co. Limited

Title:  Contract Administrator / Property Management

Reports to: VP Legal & Development / Director of Finance and Administration

Scope: To oversee a wide variety of contracts and leases and properties related to retail and wholesale petroleum operations. 

Responsibilities and Functions:

  • Oversee general process and continuous improvement related to contracts, leases and property management
  • Review financial information related to contracts, leases and properties
  • Review and develop contract and leases for a variety of business applications
  • To act as a liaison with tenants
  • To oversee records management in the organization
  • To handle corporate registrations
  • Assist with credit management
  • Prepare legal correspondence as required
  • Claims management - Insurance
  • Prepare operational reports and analysis as directed
  • Assist with maintenance and development of legal tracking systems  
  • Work with, analyze, and interpret data
  • Other duties as assigned

Skills:

  • Excellent written and oral communication skills;
  • Excellent knowledge of computer software applications, hardware and interfaces
  • Problem solving and analytical skills
  • Accuracy and attention to detail
  • Self-motivated; self starter
  • Assertive; effective in dealing with people
  • Ability to prioritize work

Education/Experience: Post-secondary education in business or law and minimum of five years related work experience. E-mail resume to Catherine Baker, Director of Finance and Administration, cbaker@wilsons.ca

**Please reply with Job Title in subject line

Kim & Lake Law, a firm located in the heart of Halifax, seeks a lawyer to join their dynamic practice.

The successful candidate will be asked to assist with on-going client files and work in areas such as immigration, corporate/commercial, and civil litigation while having the opportunity to build his or her own clientele.

As each team member is greatly valued at Kim & Lake Law, bar fees will be covered by the firm. The lawyer will work as an independent contractor with the firm, on a fee sharing arrangement.

The firm is located at the Halifax Professional Centre, 5991 Spring Garden Road, Suite 300, Halifax.

Please apply with a cover letter and resume to Ethan Kim: ethan@kimlakelaw.com

We thank all applicants, but please note that only those selected for an interview will be contacted. Lawyers who were recently called to the bar are also encouraged to apply.

Position:  Contract Staff Lawyer position in Sydney, Nova Scotia practicing criminal law with the possibility of some criminal duty counsel work.

Qualifications:  Successful candidate must be a practicing, insured member in good standing of the Nova Scotia Barristers' Society with a thorough understanding of Criminal Law.  Candidate should have experience in representing clients before the courts.  Competency to conduct legal proceedings in both the English and French languages would be an asset.  Start date to be as soon as possible.

Salary Range:  Per Legal Aid salary scale based on "Relevant Experience" as determined by the Commission at time of hire plus benefits.

Closing Date:  Friday, June 1, 2018 at 4:00 PM

Reply To:

Amy Dickson
Operations Administrative Assistant
920-1701 Hollis Street
Halifax, NS   B3J 3M8
902-420-3471 Fax
Amy.Dickson@nslegalaid.ca

Our goal is to be a diverse workforce that is representative, at all job levels, of the citizens we serve.  We have an Employment Equity Policy and welcome applications from historically disadvantaged groups, including:  Indigenous People, African Nova Scotians and Other Racially Visible Persons, Person with Disabilities, and Women in occpations or positions where they are under-represented.  If you are a member of one of the equity groups, you are encouraged to self-identify, on your application form, cover letter, or resume.

While we appreciate receiving all applications, only applicants selected for an interview will be contacted.  All applicaitons will be held in strict confidence.

Highlander Law Group has an opening for a summer intern to join our team on a part-time basis between May-June 2018. Preference will be given to candidates who have completed two years of law school, but those having completed first year are eligible to apply.

This will be an unpaid position but which will give the successful candidate exposure to the daily workings of lawyers practicing in the areas of real estate, family, litigation, corporate commercial and estate planning. To learn more, visit our website Highlander Law Group

We are willing to offer a flexible start date as well as work hours but require the candidate to complete a minimum of 20 hours per week between the hours of 9:00a.m. to 4:00p.m.

The successful candidates will have a professional but friendly demeanor, excellent written and verbal communication skills, attention to detail, a quick learner and be a true team player.

Please send applications to info@highlanderlaw.ca and include a cover letter, resume and unofficial law school transcript. Deadline to apply is Tuesday, May 22nd 4pm. Only candidates selected for interviews will be contacted.

Halifax Regional Municipality (HRM) is seeking a permanent Solicitor for the Solicitor Services Team, primarily providing legal services in real property.  We encourage applications from qualified African Nova Scotians, racially visible persons, women in non-traditional positions, persons with disabilities and Aboriginal persons. HRM encourages applicants to self-identify.

HRM Legal Services provides quality, cost effective, timely and accessible legal services to meet the needs of HRM through its Council, various departments, boards, commissions, and employees. This Solicitor would be a member of the Solicitor Services Team, reporting to a Team Lead and the Director, and would provide legal services to the Halifax Regional Municipality (HRM).

The Solicitor is responsible for providing legal advice and assistance to HRM staff conducting daily business and long term planning for the HRM. The Solicitor will provide accessible, efficient and expert counsel in legal matters responsive to client department needs. The Solicitor will be a client focused and self-motivated individual who will work both independently and with a team of lawyers and support staff, including another real property lawyer and paralegal, in the delivery of legal services to HRM client departments.

Qualifications, Education and Experience:

  • Law Degree from a recognized university;
  • Minimum five (5) years relevant experience in the practice of law;
  • Member of the Nova Scotia Barristers Society or be qualified to be admitted;
  • Experience in the following areas of practice: property/real estate transactions, corporate, commercial
  • Experience in municipal, corporate and/or commercial law would be considered an asset.

Competencies:  Communication; Customer Service; Organization and Planning; Organizational Awareness; Values & Ethics; Valuing Diversity

Job Status:  This is a permanent, full time position, 35 Hours per week, Monday through Friday, 8:30am – 4:30pm.  The work location is 5251 Duke Street, Duke Tower, 3rd Floor, Halifax, Nova Scotia.  This is a non-union position salary commensurate with education and experience.

CLOSING DATE:  Applications will be accepted up to Midnight on June 5th, 2018

During the recruitment process, applicants have the right to request an accommodation.  Applicants invited to participate in an assessment process (such as an interview or testing) and who require accommodation, should discuss their needs with the Recruiter when invited to the assessment process.

Qualified HRM retirees may also be considered for competitions. In these circumstances, a form of employment may be offered, including term and/or contract employment.

For a more detailed description and to apply for this position please go to our website: http://www.halifax.ca/employment/index.php

Seeking a full-time paralegal at Highlander Law Group, a general practice law firm in Tantallon. Our ideal candidate is a professional, yet enthusiastic person with a strong attention to detail and a positive ‘can do’ attitude.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

  • Preparation and revision of letters, court forms, affidavits, deeds, corporate minute books and various other required documents both independently and via dictation;
  • Liaise with external lawyers and the courts as required;
  • Significant client contact via phone, email and in person;
  • Elements of office management (eg. managing incoming invoices)
  • Receiving and processing clients funds;
  • Time entry and preparation of pre-bills;
  • Assist will all elements of the firms marketing efforts, including attending local functions.
  • Coordinating and scheduling appointments;
  • Managing office supplies;
  • Maintaining the reception area and boardroom;
  • Photocopying, faxing, mailing, filing, scanning, dictation, assembling of court documents;
  • Initially this employee will also fulfill general reception duties.

QUALIFICATIONS:

  • Understand that maintaining a high level of professionalism and confidentiality is paramount;
  • A desire to work with minimal supervision, multi-task and prioritize projects, follow detailed instructions and work under strict deadlines in a fast paced environment;
  • An understanding of when to follow directions and when to take the initiative to solve or prevent a problem, along with a willingness to take ownership of final work product;
  • Well-developed communication and interpersonal skills and a strong customer service focus;
  • Attention to detail, excellent grammar and spelling skills; and strong organization skills;
  • Above average proficiency in Microsoft Office and an ability to learn new software quickly.
  • Competent using the internet including familiarity with popular social media platforms.

We offer a competitive salary, commensurate with experience.  We are open to creative negotiation with respect to total compensation (eg. Flex-time, Benefits) Hours will typically be M-F, 8:30 – 4:00, though some extended hours may be required on occasion.

Interested candidates may apply, in confidence, by emailing their cover letter and resume to info@highlanderlaw.ca Applications will be accepted up to 4pm, May 31st .

Hi,

I passed my NCA exams. I passed administration law from Dalhousie University.

I am looking a articling position In Nova Scotia, no matter which city. I am able to start soon.

Thanks

Rajeev Sharma

647 889 2793

 

Barteaux Durnford is a boutique labour and employment law firm representing private and public sector employers throughout Atlantic Canada.  We are the Atlantic Canada member of the Employment Law Alliance, the world’s largest network of labour and employment lawyers.

We pride ourselves on our team work and emphasize the importance of a collaborative and positive culture.  We offer challenging work, the latest in technology, great office space, competitive compensation and benefits, and a collegial and fun work environment.

We are seeking a Legal Administrative Assistant for a full-time opportunity.  This position will be a varied role providing administrative support to two Associates.

This is a great role for an assistant who enjoys a dynamic desk and is looking for an opportunity to develop legal and technological skills. 

Job Title:  Legal Administrative Assistant

Reports to:  Office Manager and Assigned Associates

Job Purpose:  The position will include preparing correspondence, reports and other documents; managing and responding to emails and phone calls; scheduling appointments, mediations, arbitrations and discoveries; coordinating client activities (booking meeting rooms, answering phones and greeting clients); organizing and maintaining client files.

Knowledge, Qualities & Experience Required:

  • A Legal Assistant certificate is preferred. However, varying combinations of education and experience may be accepted;
  • Advanced knowledge of Microsoft Work and experience with Document Management is an asset along with an understanding of litigation and eDiscovery procedures;
  • Excellent transcription and proof reading skills;
  • Be highly organized and detail oriented;
  • A quick learner with an aptitude for computers and various software programs;
  • Strong communication, organizational, problem-solving, decision-making and project management skills;
  • Team player providing exception levels of service to clients, lawyers and colleagues;
  • Ability to manage multiple priorities and remain productive within a time-sensitive and fast-paced environment; and
  • Exhibit common sense, patience and, a sense of teamwork.

We offer a competitive compensation package, modern offices and a great culture.  This is an excellent opportunity for candidates who enjoy a challenge and want to be part of a small, exciting law firm.

If you are interested in this position, please email a cover letter and resume by June 8 to:
Jo-Ann.Melanson@BarteauxDurnford.com.

We thank all applicants for their interest. However, only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

Job Title: Legal Counsel

Req ID: 20605

Location: Provincial, Centennial Building - QEII

Company: NSHA

Department: Legal Services

Type of Employment: Temporary Hourly FT short-term  (100% FTE) x 1 position(s)

Union Status: Non-Union

Posting Closing Date: June 6, 2018

Applications are accepted until 11:59 PM on the Closing Date.

Nova Scotia Health Authority is the largest provider of health services in Nova Scotia. We are over 22,000 employees who provide health care and support services in hospitals, health centres and community-based programs throughout Nova Scotia. Nova Scotia Health Authority provides health services to Nova Scotians and some specialized services to Maritimers and Atlantic Canadians. We operate hospitals, health centres and community-based programs across the province. Our team of health professionals includes employees, doctors, researchers, learners and volunteers that provide the health care or services you may need. This is accomplished across four geographic management zones which are responsible for the operation of acute care health centres and the provision of a variety of inpatient, outpatient services including academic, tertiary, quaternary care and community based programs and services including continuing care, primary health care, public health, and mental health and addictions.

Responsibilities

Legal Counsel acts as a corporate resource to the Nova Scotia Health Authority (NSHA). He/she provides sound legal and medical/ethical guidance to employees and, medical staff of the NSHA, taking into consideration other activities within the NSHA and established health, human resource, corporate and administrative law practices across the country. Legal Counsel also provides advice and strategic direction in the coordination of risk identification, reduction, assessment, investigation, management and resolution.

Qualifications

* Bachelor of Laws from a recognized Canadian University

* Practicing or current eligibility to become a member of the Nova Scotia Barristers Society

* 1-5 years in active practice of law preferred

* Experience in Commercial Law, including contract negotiation and drafting, an asset

* Experience in Healthcare Law and Administrative Law, including legislation governing health authorities and public bodies, also an asset

* Excellent oral and written communication skills, interpersonal skills and negotiating skills

* Ability to function independently* Demonstrated competent research and practical analytical skills

* High degree of tact and diplomacy

* Demonstrated computer skills

* Competencies in other languages an asset, French preferred  

PLEASE NOTE: Applicants relying on education and experience equivalencies must clearly state such equivalencies in their cover letter, resume, or application.  Additionally, candidates will not be considered for an interview if applications are incomplete or are missing information

Hours of Work: 

Short Assignment Full-Time Position; 75 hours bi-weekly

With an approximate start date of June 18, 2018 with an expected end date of December 17, 2018

These are anticipated dates and are subject to change

Salary Information$ 32.7415 - $ 40.9268 hourly

Thank you for your interest in this position. Only those applicants selected for an interview will be contacted. Typically interviews are held within three to four weeks of the closing date.Successful external applicants will be required to submit a criminal record check and assume any associated costs, as a condition of employment.Nova Scotia Health Authority is proud to provide a smoke free and scent free environment.Nova Scotia Health Authority (NSHA) is committed to being a workforce that is free of discrimination, values diversity and is representative, at all job levels, of the people we serve. Our priority groups are: Aboriginal People, African Nova Scotians, Persons with Disabilities and Recent Immigrants. Members of these groups are welcome to apply and self-identify if they wish to be considered under our Employment Equity policy.Only online applications are accepted.

Follow us on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/NSHA.Recruitment/

TO APPLY: https://career17.sapsf.com/sfcareer/jobreqcareer?jobId=20605&company=NSHAP&username=

Farrow Law, located in beautiful St. Margaret’s Bay, is seeking an experienced paralegal for a full-time position in our busy rural practice. Applicants must have experience in real estate, wills & estates, and family law.

Qualifications:

• Attention to detail and a high level of efficiency and accuracy;

• Confidence, strong work ethic and reliability are essential;

• Strong organizational skills, competent with management of files, schedules and deadlines;

• Ability to multitask and produce accurate work product with short timelines;

• Personable, pleasant and respectful in dealings with clients, co-workers and interactions with other professionals;

• Excellent customer service, communication and interpersonal skills;

• Ability to work independently and displays confidentiality, discretion and professionalism;

• LRA trained, as well as experience with all aspects of property transactions;

• Experience with family law, court document preparation and filing procedures, competency with ChildView program an asset;

• Experience with drafting of estate planning documentation and probate documentation, as well as experience with probate court requirements and procedures;

• Proficiency in MS Office, experience with PCLaw an asset;

• Experience time keeping, client billing, retainers, retainer agreements;

• Knowledge of trust accounting procedures;

• Proficiency in MS Office

Position is available immediately. Salary is negotiable and will be commensurate with experience. Only applicants selected for an interview will be contacted. Please apply in confidence to jackie@farrowlaw.ca

Behind every one of our products and services is a team of motivated, intelligent and hard-working employees. As the largest provider of home, auto and business insurance in the country, every one of our 13,000 employees believes that our customer service focus is second to none - and you will too!

Are you interested in making a real difference in people's lives? Would you enjoy helping people get back on their feet when they have suffered a setback? At Intact we help people, businesses and society prosper in good times, and be resilient in bad times.

Would you like?

  • A highly competitive Total Rewards Program
  • Industry leading Benefits
  • Employee Share Purchase Plan
  • Fitness Subsidy
  • Working in a socially and environmentally responsible organization
  • Being part of a diverse workforce that measures you by the values of Respect, Integrity, Customer Service and Striving for Excellence
  • Community participation through paid volunteer opportunities

Are you a detail-oriented, strong self-starter who shows initiative and places a high value on teamwork and cooperation? Are you eager to get your foot in the door with a national industry-leading organization? As a Legal Assistant with the Intact Insurance Legal Claims department, in our Dartmouth, NS office, you will be a key member providing administrative support to Legal Counsel. Your responsibilities will include:

  • Drafting correspondence, court documents and summarizing information in files
  • Scheduling examinations for discovery, examinations under oath, mediations, meetings and various hearings at Court
  • Maintaining Legal Counsel's calendar and supervising their practice
  • Scheduling appointments for Legal Counsel
  • Dicta-typing/Word processing, filing and general office duties
  • May conduct research into cases and handle relevant case correspondence

You must have:

  • Community college diploma and/or university degree in a related field
  • At least 5 years of experience working as a legal assistant, preferably within an insurance defense or personal injury law firm
  • Working knowledge of the Civil Procedure Rules

Your additional skills:

  • Ability to work independently, prioritize, organize and execute your tasks in a quality manner to meet deadlines
  • Effective customer service skills
  • Excellent communication, listening, organizational and interpersonal skills
  • A disciplined and professional approach to work
  • Excellent computer skills and proficiency in dictation
  • Ability to draft correspondence, pleadings, briefs and affidavits of documents
  • Ability to summarize medical information and file documentation
  • Proficiency in managing a legal practice, including scheduling IME's, discoveries and mediations

Applicants must be permanently eligible to work in Canada upon hire. Proof of eligibility for permanent roles may come in the form or a Canadian birth certificate, Canadian passport, Canadian citizenship certificate, permanent residence card or Confirmation of Permanent Residence document.

As part of Intact's selection process, candidates may be requested to consent to background checks relevant to the role under consideration for, prior to receiving a written job offer. These could include: work references, education and credential confirmation, employment verification, identity check, credit report, criminal offence and driver's license report.

Posting closes on May 11th, 2018.

Please apply online at careers.intact.ca, to job posting #115295

Cox & Palmer is a full-service, top-ranked Atlantic Canadian law firm with the knowledge and experience clients rely upon for solid legal solutions. The firm prides itself on a collegial work atmosphere and supportive team environment. We hire self-motivated, team-minded individuals with a strong work ethic, integrity and a commitment to client service.

Our Halifax office is currently seeking a Senior Associate to join our growing Insurance Litigation practice group. 

The successful candidate will have experience:

  • Providing a high-level of client service in all areas of the insurance industry, but primarily in the defence of property and casualty claims;
  • Managing an extensive case load with minimal supervision;
  • Advocating on behalf of clients – both in written and oral form - at all levels of court and using ADR;
  • Engaging in strategic business development to enhance existing client relationships and attract new clients; and
  • Acting as a mentor to junior associates and articled clerks.

Skills and Qualifications

  • Minimum of 5 years of experience in insurance litigation;
  • Knowledge of relevant legislation and key jurisprudence covering all areas of insurance;
  • A highly motivated self-starter who has the ability to work well both autonomously and in a team environment; and
  • A member of the Nova Scotia Bar (or the potential to become a member).

Cox & Palmer’s Halifax office provides a competitive compensation and benefits package including:

  • Professional Development & Business Development allowances;
  • Employer paid parking & professional membership fees;
  • Smartphone allowance;
  • Health, dental, life and disability insurance;
  • Employee assistance program; and
  • Annual health and fitness allowance.

Qualified candidates who are interested in this position should send a covering letter and resume by Friday, May 11, 2018 to:

Tara Randell
Director of Professional Talent
Cox & Palmer
Suite 1100
1959 Upper Water Street,
Halifax, NS B3J 3N2
Direct (902) 491-4453
trandell@coxandpalmer.com

I am a graduate of McGill University. I did my legal studies in England. In April 2018, I completed the NCA (National Committee Accreditation) Qualification Program at the University of Ottawa (Common Law Division). I would like to relocate to Nova Scotia.

I shall provide my resume and references upon request.

I can be reached at ddoug014@uottawa.ca

In response to continued growth and success of ORB, our professional team is growing. We seek a highly motivated and experienced Paralegal to assist with contract administration, intellectual property and risk assessment matters.

ORB is the fastest growing toy company in North America, doing business in over 60 countries, and internationally recognized for our award winning brands and high quality products.Working at ORB gives you the experience of working in a major international company with the growth potential, hands on experience, and learning opportunities one would find in a much smaller company. Our main focus is to develop toys that create moments of awe and wonder for children all around the globe. We provide a working environment that is full of fast- paced excitement, collaborative creativity, and opportunity.

The Role: The ideal candidate will have experience in contracts administration and management of trademark, copyright and patent clearance, registration, and renewal matters. This role requires a high level of attention to detail, strong client services orientation, and excellent follow up and communication skills. The best candidate likely has training received at a larger law firm or other global business, and is smart, highly organized, efficient, thinks creatively, has a positive work attitude, and is comfortable following directions as well as working independently.

Core duties and responsibilities:

  • Manage ORB’s in-house systems for tracking status, deadlines and actions due in contract and intellectual property matters
  • Track and assist with trademark clearance searches
  • Assist outside legal counsel with trademark, copyright and patent filings
  • Monitor intellectual property filings and maintain certificates of registration
  • Review and manage all legal correspondence and drafting, including contracts, leases, terms and conditions, licenses,and non-disclosure agreements and the like
  • Litigation support (court filings, litigation holds, evidence collection and management)
  • Liaise with intellectual property law firms in North America and Asia
  • Preparation and filing of routine corporate documents, maintain corporate records

Required skills and knowledge:

  • Bachelor’s degree in business management, paralegal studies or equivalent on-the-job experience and proven expertise
  • 4-8 years experience as a Paralegal
  • Knowledge of Intellectual Property clearance, filing, and prosecution practices and rules
  • Ability to work with multiple departments with conflicting and demanding deadlines
  • Flexible and able to adapt to last minute direction and changes with demonstrated ability to work in a creative, fast-paced environment

Additional experience helpful:

  • Knowledge of advertising law and privacy law
  • Knowledge of Charter of the French Language in relation to packaging and labels
  • Business French written and spoken
  • Litigation support (court filings, evidence collection and management)
  • Knowledge of WebTMS or similar trademark docketing software
  • Experience in enforcement work, cease and desist letters, social media takedowns, trademark investigations, and UDRP domain name dispute proceedings
  • Promotions and advertising experience, including sweepstakes and contests
  • Preparation and management of U.S. and Canadian copyright filings
  • Knowledge of Customs recordals and other boarder measures to protect intellectual property rights

Please submit your resume and a cover letter that highlights how your past experience aligns with our environment and requirements to jobs@orbtoys.com. We thank all applicants for their interest; however, only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

I completed the NCA (National Committee Accreditation) Qualification Program at the University of Ottawa (Common Law Division). Currently I am working with a lawyer in Toronto. I want to relocate to Nova Scotia. I would provide my resume and references upon request. My email is narinderthandi@hotmail.com

Established Bedford law firm is seeking a full time permanent legal assistant with litigation/personal injury experience.  The successful candidate should possess the following:

- proficiency in MS Office.  Experience with PClaw software also an asset

- accurate spelling and grammar with attention to detail

- strong organizational, interpersonal and communication  skills

- ability to maintain confidentiality

- ability to work independently and as part of a team

Salary is commensurate with experience.  A group health plan is available.

We offer a very friendly and supportive work environment.  Please forward your resume to:

glenn.jones@pressemason.com

Only candidates selected for an interview will be contacted. 

Competition # 12789 

Solicitor 3, Permanent, HALIFAX  

Justice  

Posting Closing Date: 5/28/2018  

Our goal is to be a diverse workforce that is representative, at all job levels, of the citizens we serve.  The Government of Nova Scotia has an Employment Equity Policy and we welcome applications from Aboriginal People, African Nova Scotians and Other Racially Visible Persons, Persons with Disabilities and Women in occupations or positions where they are under-represented.  If you are a member of one of the equity groups, you are encouraged to self-identify, on your application form, cover letter, or on your resume.

Division Overview

The Department of Justice, Legal Services Division, is the law firm for the Province of Nova Scotia.  Justice lawyers have the opportunity to participate in a broad range of legal issues, providing legal services to the Crown and promoting the fair and lawful administration of public affairs in accordance with the law.  The Legal Services Division consists of Solicitor Services, Litigation Services and the Registry of Regulations.  We are currently recruiting for a lawyer with significant experience in commercial transactions and major contracts.

Duties

As a member of the contracts/commercial group, the lawyer will be responsible for the effective and efficient representation of the Crown in major contracts and commercial transactions.  

Qualifications

Required:

  • Be a practicing member of the Nova Scotia Barristers Society (or be eligible for practicing membership)
  • Have a minimum of six years of significant commercial and contracts practicing experience
  • Have a working knowledge of computer software programs, Internet and electronic mail

 Experience in the following areas would be considered assets:

  • Government projects
  • Complex, high value projects
  • Real property law
  • P3 (Public Private Partnerships) projects
  • Procurement
  • IT contracts
  • Privacy law
  • Significant negotiation experience   

The successful candidate will have a demonstrated ability to offer sound legal advice and creative and innovative solutions to complex challenges, as well as the flexibility to adapt and thrive in a continuously changing and demanding environment.  The incumbent will be computer literate, able to effectively deal with stressful situations and have proven analytical, research and drafting skills.  The lawyer will possess effective interpersonal communications skills (verbal and written) and the ability to function with minimal supervision in a team environment.  

Pay Grade:  MCL 26  

Salary Range:  $3,464.00 - $5,307.00 Bi-Weekly  

We thank all applicants for their interest, however, only those selected for an interview will be contacted. 

Offer of employment is conditional upon the completion of all applicable background checks and confirmation of credentials, the results of which must be satisfactory to the employer. 

For questions or concerns, please contact Competitions@novascotia.ca

Position:  Contract Staff Lawyer position in Sydney, Nova Scotia practicing Family Law.

Qualifications:  Successful candidate must be a practicing, insured member in good standing of the Nova Scotia Barristers' Society with a thorough understanding of Family Law.  Candidate should have experience in representing clients before the courts.  Competency to conduct legal proceedings in both the English and French languages would be an asset.  Start date to be as soon as possible.

Salary Range:  Per Legal Aid salary scale based on "Relevant Experience" as determined by the Commission at time of hire plus benefits.

Closing Date:  Friday, June 8, 2018 at 4:00 PM

Send Resume with Cover Letter:

Amy Dickson, Operations Administrative Assistant

Nova Scotia Legal Aid Commission

920-1701 Hollis Street

Halifax, NS   B3J 3M8

902-420-3471 Fax

Amy.Dickson@nslegalaid.ca

Our goal is to be a diverse workforce that is representative, at all job levels, of the citizens we serve.  We have an Employment Equity Policy and welcome applications from historcially disadvantaged groups, including:  Indigenous People, African Nova Scotians and Other Racially Visible Persons, Persons with Disabilities, and Women in occupations or positions where they are under-represented.  If you are a memeber of one of the equity groups , you  are encourgead to self-identify, on your application form, cover letter, or resume.

While we appreciate receiving all applications, only applicants slected for an interview will be contacted.  All applications will be held in strict confidence.

Paquet Law, located in Truro, NS, is hiring a law student for 8 weeks. Start and end dates are flexible.

If you are interested in working in a small firm with an emphasis in family law, then send your resume to our firm email, paquetlawoffice@bellaliant.com. Thank you.

The East Coast Environmental Law Association (ECELAW) invites applications for a 12-week Summer Student position to be held between June 11th and August 31st, 2018. The successful applicant will undertake two distinct projects, as described below. 

ECELAW is an environmental law charity. From our offices in Halifax, we work throughout Atlantic Canada to secure a clean, healthy environment through public legal education, community collaboration, and legal action. ECELAW’s Summer Student will work to enhance the organization’s public education programming by helping to develop a community legal clinic and an interactive session designed to teach high school students about environmental law.  

Project I: Prince Edward Island Water Clinic (8 weeks) 

ECELAW aims to deliver a community legal clinic in Prince Edward Island, focusing on the province’s Water Act and corresponding regulations. To support the development of this clinic, the Summer Student will: 

  • complete research on the subject area;
  • develop resource materials to be used in clinic sessions;
  • assist in implementing the clinic; and
  • prepare and administer follow-up evaluations.

Student work on the Prince Edward Island Water Clinic project is funded by the Canada Summer Jobs program.  

Project II: Youth to Youth – Law and Environment (4 weeks) 

ECELAW aims to deliver a 1-day interactive session on environmental law directed at high school students and facilitated by law students. The dual purpose of the session is to expose high school students to the role of law and policy in environmental matters and create mentorship opportunities between law school students and other youth. To support the development of this session, the Summer Student will: 

  • gather information on similar projects in Canada through online research and telephone consultations;
  • develop a draft framework for the session, including interactive presentations, discussion groups, brainstorming exercises, and an outdoor experiential component;
  • identify law student facilitators and candidate schools;
  • arrange with the administration of a selected school to pilot the project.

Student work on the Youth to Youth – Law and Environment Project is funded by the TD Friends of the Environment Foundation.     

Summer students funded by the Canada Summer Jobs program must: be between 15 and 30 years of age (inclusive) at the start of employment; have been registered as full-time students during the 2017-2018 academic year; intend to return to school on a full-time basis during the 2018-2019 academic year; be Canadian citizens, permanent residents, or persons on whom refugee protection has been conferred under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, and be legally entitled to work in Nova Scotia. 

The ECELAW Summer Student position is open to all law students who meet these requirements. 

Applications should include a cover letter and CV, and should be sent electronically as a single .pdf file to admin@ecelaw.ca.

Cover letters may be addressed to: Lisa Mitchell, Executive Director, East Coast Environmental Law Association, 6061 University Ave., PO Box 15000, Halifax, NS, B3H 4R2.

The deadline for applications has been extended to June 4, 2018.  

Experienced Real Estate/Wills & Estates Paralegal

Clyde Paul & Associates Inc., a small longstanding community based law firm, located in suburban Halifax has an immediate opening for a full time experienced paralegal to join our busy practice. The idea candidate will fill the role of a Real Estate and Will & Estates paralegal within our firm and work closely with the firm's lawyers in this role.

Functions and Qualifications:

* A positive attitude and work ethic;

* 5+ years work experience and paralegal diploma;

* Demonstrated experience in file management, document control and management of limitation diaries and lawyer’s schedules;

* Excellent skills with drafting documents and correspondence ensuring accuracy and timely completion;

* Must be comfortable interacting with and meeting clients in person and on the phone;

* Attention to detail;

* Must be able to display a high level of professionalism, confidentially and discretion in dealing with clients and other contacts;

* Self motivated;

* Ability to multitask and handle a fast paced environment with short deadlines;

* Ability to work overtime, when needed;

* LRA trained with the Land Registration Act, Regulations, Land Registration Manual and prescribed forms;

* Preparation of closing documents, Statement of Adjustments and Statement of Trust Summary;

* Facilitating full cycle Real Estate transactions and all related work including purchase, sale, refinance and new home construction;

* Experience with the probate process and forms for filing with the Court;

* Experience with preparation of Wills, Powers of Attorney and Personal Health Care Directives;

This position is a permanent, full time position Monday through Friday, 8:30 to 4:30. Salary and benefit negotiable and commensurate with experience. Only applicants being considered for an interview will be contacted. Please apply with Resume and cover letter to k.conrad@ns.sympatico.ca

As Executive Director of the Offshore Energy Research Association, you will play an important role in the research and development of the energy sector in Nova Scotia. 

On behalf of the Board of Directors, we are seeking a highly-respected person with broad skills and well-developed leadership abilities to lead the organization. 

What qualities are needed as Executive Director?

The job of Executive Director is a challenging one that requires a seasoned leader proficient in managing complex relationships in academia, research, industry, government, and the community. Collaborative by nature, you must be able to build consensus among these stakeholders while moving research agendas forward – on time and within budget. 

You will report to the Board of Directors. As such, you must have proven experience working collectively with elected boards and committees. You bring a full understanding of governance models and processes, and always provide sound advice on strategic and policy matters.  

Ideally, you have sound knowledge of the energy sector in Nova Scotia, as well as an understanding of scientific research, peer review process, funding & award mechanisms.   

From an operational point of view, you have well-developed skills in human resources, financial management, operations, marketing and public relations, research, policy development, and strategic planning.  

You have a practical and transparent approach to fiscal and policy management and possess a post-graduate degree in management, public administration, research, science, or law. 

For more information on this organization, including its history, mandate and key stakeholders, please visit www.oera.ca

Does this sound like you? If so, write us a cover letter describing the contributions you can make to Offshore Energy Research Association, and merge this letter into your resume as one document. You can email this information to us at apply@geraldwalsh.com quoting project number 1759 in the subject line. We encourage applications from all qualified individuals.

Competition # 13544 
 
Land Registry Manager/Senior Deputy Registrar General of Land Titles, Permanent, HALIFAX  
 
Office of Service Nova Scotia 
 
Posting Closing Date: June 15, 2018  
 
Our goal is to be a diverse workforce that is representative, at all job levels, of the citizens we serve. The Government of Nova Scotia has an Employment Equity Policy and we welcome applications from Aboriginal People, African Nova Scotians and Other Racially Visible Persons, Persons with Disabilities and Women in occupations or positions where they are under-represented. If you are a member of one of the equity groups, you are encouraged to self-identify, on your application form, cover letter, or on your resume.

Duties 
 
The Land Registry Manager is responsible for the correct interpretation of the acts and that the confidence in the external stakeholders and public is retained in the Land Registry system. The Land Registry Manager is the Senior Deputy Registrar General. This position plays a critical role in the relationship management with key stakeholders such as the Nova Scotia Barristers' Society and Association of Nova Scotia Land Surveyors and is a leadership position within the Land Programs section and a member of the divisions and departmental management team. In addition, the incumbent will be responsible for:
  • The provision of expert advice regarding any matter arising from the Land Programs statutes and supporting regulations, policies, standards and processes.
  • Identifying and mitigating potential risks to the Province related to the Land Registry to protect the integrity of the system.
  • Establishing and maintaining professional working relationships with other program managers, service providers, production support groups and program integration partners (e.g., Municipal Relations).
  • Collaborating with internal and external stakeholders on short and long-term solutions to improve legislation, regulations, policies and practices.
  • Provision of support to the Director/Registrar General in the short and long term operational planning, short and long-term budget planning and Human Resources planning and development.
Qualifications 

A member of the Nova Scotia Barristers’ Society and Qualified Lawyer as defined in the Land Registration Act, with experience in real estate practice, or a person with significant experience with the Land Registration Act and system as a paralegal, government employee or otherwise. The successful candidate will have proven management and leadership skills.

Demonstrated experience in building and maintaining relationships with internal and external stakeholders is required.

Experience with administrative law, regulatory enforcement, interpreting legislation and policies are assets, along with quality assurance and risk management.

Competencies 

Conceptual Thinking 
Strategic Orientation 
Outcome Focus 
Initiative 
Effective Interactive Communication 
Partnering & Relationship Building 
Intercultural Diversity Proficiency 

Pay Grade: EC 12  

Salary Range: $2,874.00 - $3,953.00 Bi-Weekly
 
To apply for this position online, see the original job posting on the Government of Nova Scotia's career opportunities website at jobs.novascotia.ca
 
All current employees who wish to be considered an internal candidate, please click here.

We thank all applicants for their interest, however, only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

Offer of employment is conditional upon the completion of all applicable background checks and confirmation of credentials, the results of which must be satisfactory to the employer.

For questions or concerns, please contact Competitions@novascotia.ca.

 

OVERSEAS PLACEMENTS AROUND THE GLOBE

The CBA has received funding from Global Affairs Canada to select and place thirty-two (32) young Canadian lawyers (and recent law graduates) in 2018-2019 as interns with human rights and legal development organizations overseas.

Preparation for overseas placements begins in summer 2018, including a short briefing in July and basic logistical and substantive preparations.  The six-month placements are undertaken from September 2018 to March 2019.

The YLIP contributes a modest living and accommodation allowance, assists in covering health insurance, and covers travel costs related to briefing/debriefing sessions in Canada and to overseas placements.  The due date for submission of applications is June 4th, 2018.  

For further information about the program, please see the CBA YLIP opportunities web page at http://www.cba.org/CBA-International-Initiatives/Young-Lawyers-International-Program and its Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/CBAYLIP. Please carefully note eligibility guidelines and details on how to apply.

 

Legal Aid Saskatchewan is seeking a 0.64 FTE term lawyer for its Swift Current Area Office for a period of one year, commencing in September 2018, to practice in the areas of adult and youth criminal and family law.  

Legal Aid Saskatchewan provides accessible and professional legal services in criminal and family law to eligible people.

Applicants should be lawyers entitled to practice in Saskatchewan with experience in litigation in Provincial and Superior Courts.  Placement within the salary range [$39.50 to $71.28 per hour] is commensurate with experience. The position is within the Union. 

This is an opportunity for people who see the practice of law as more than just a job.  This is an opportunity to help people who really need it, every day, and to hone your legal skills while doing so.

We encourage applications from people of Aboriginal ancestry, persons of a visible minority group, persons with disabilities and women seeking management and non-traditional roles.  Legal Aid Saskatchewan has an employment equity program approved by the Saskatchewan Human Rights Commission.

Please forward resume with references prior to June 14, 2018 to:

Human Resources

Legal Aid Saskatchewan – Head Office

#502 - 201 21st Street East   

SASKATOON SK    S7K 0B8

FAX: (306) 933-6764

E-Mail: humanresources@legalaid.sk.ca

Web: www.legalaid.sk.ca

We thank all applicants, however only candidates to be interviewed will be contacted.

Stewart McKelvey is an innovative, client-driven law firm committed to providing the highest quality of ethical legal services, earning clients' trust and striving to meet and exceed expectations.

The firm invests in its people, technology and its business to ensure the continued delivery of the quality service that clients have come to expect from the firm.  Stewart McKelvey has earned a reputation as a leader in the profession and a supporter of the communities in which we live and work.  Our forward thinking perspective results in outperforming expectations.

As a firm, we value diversity and are committed to providing a workplace that fosters a culture of awareness, appreciation and respect. It is our mission to promote diversity and inclusion throughout the firm, to support the diversity initiatives of our clients, and to encourage greater inclusion in our communities through sponsorships and support. It is our belief that diversity and inclusion enhances the delivery of legal services to our clients through the respected and valued input of diverse perspectives, ideas and experiences.

Stewart McKelvey is looking for an Associate Lawyer to join our Immigration team in our Halifax, NS office. The ideal candidate will have a minimum of one year of Immigration experience related to temporary residence permits (work, study, visit); permanent residency applications; citizenship; and immigration advocacy. Candidates with strong interpersonal and communication skills will be given preference. Applicants should outline their demonstrated experience working as part of a Immigration team as well as managing client matters independently. 

This is a partnership track role and, as such, candidates must actively participate in client development and corporate social responsibility initiatives. 

Stewart McKelvey takes pride in providing exceptional service to our clients and our ability to offer Associates challenging legal work often found only in larger urban centres. We offer a collegial work environment, unsurpassed technical and professional support, a competitive compensation package, and the opportunity to work with some of Atlantic Canada’s leading lawyers. 

Interested applicants must be a member in good standing with a Canadian Law Society and should provide a resume and cover letter, including detail on the type of immigration experience the applicant offers by Monday, June 18, 2018 to hr@stewartmckelvey.com.

If you have specific questions about this role, please contact Susan Hayes at shayes@stewartmckelvey.com or 902.490.8574.  All inquiries will be held in strict confidence.

 We thank all applicants for their interest. However, only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

 No agencies please.

Seaboard Transport is a privately-held organization comprised of number transport brands across Canada and the United States. We are a leader within the North American transportation industry that operates with innovation and creativity. We have grown by providing excellent service in both the petroleum and chemical industries and have diversified into dedicated transport of other bulk commodities. Our organization is driven by entrepreneurial values focusing on safe, reliable and professional service. 

We offer a fast-paced, challenging work environment that is constantly growing and evolving. We are excited to add a Legal Counsel and Manager of Claims to our team at our headquarters in Dartmouth, NS. We are looking for an individual who is interested in developing their career while contributing to the growth of our business in a dynamic and stimulating work environment.  

Position: Legal Counsel and Manager of Claims

Location: Dartmouth, NS

Core Responsibilities:

  • The primary focus of this role is to manage claims in an effort to minimize loss following an accident or incident
  • Provide legal advice and coordinate legal service providers on a wide variety of corporate matters
  • The role will also be responsible for forward-looking risk mitigation and management
  • The incumbent will manage all accident and incident files and act as a company representative with various groups, such as: independent contractors, lawyers, insurance companies, environmental consultants etc. 
  • Provide accurate reporting on losses to management and senior management
  • Work to build and maintain effective relationships throughout the organization in order to add value to various divisions
  • Provision of legal assistance and advice in dealing with reviews, investigations or claims against, and by the company
  • Other duties as required

Job Requirements:

  • Bachelor of Laws from a recognized University
  • Member of the Nova Scotia Barristers’ Society
  • 2-5 years in active practice of law preferred
  • Exposure to the Canadian courts system
  • Previous experience with or extensive knowledge of insurance claims and policies relevant to the transportation industry considered an asset
  • A versatile corporate/commercial law background, with the ability to identify and respond to complex legal, regulatory and business issues under time constraints
  • Sound problem-solving and decision-making skills
  • Strong influencing skills
  • Strong attention to detail
  • Exceptional planning and organizational skills
  • Excellent communication and presentation skills

We are committed to employment equity and welcome applications from women, visible minorities, aboriginal people and persons with disabilities.

To apply please submit your cover letter and resume via email to:

Kaitlyn Parker

Email: kparker@seaboard.acl.ca

Cox & Palmer is a full-service, top-ranked Atlantic Canadian law firm with the knowledge and experience clients rely upon for solid legal solutions. The firm prides itself on a collegial work atmosphere and supportive team environment. We hire self-motivated, team-minded individuals with a strong work ethic, integrity and a commitment to client service.

Our Halifax office is currently seeking an Associate to join our growing Insurance Litigation practice group.

The successful candidate will have experience:
• Providing a high-level of client service in all areas of the insurance industry, but primarily in the defence of property and casualty claims;
• Managing a variety of files with minimal supervision; and
• Advocating on behalf of clients – both in written and oral form - at all levels of court and using ADR;

SKILLS AND QUALIFICATIONS

• Minimum of 2-3 years of experience in insurance litigation;
• Knowledge of relevant legislation and key jurisprudence covering all areas of insurance;
• A highly motivated self-starter who has the ability to work well both autonomously and in a team environment; and
• A member of the Nova Scotia Bar (or the potential to become a member).

Cox & Palmer’s Halifax office provides a competitive compensation and benefits package including:

• Flexible work arrangements;
• Professional Development & Business Development allowances;
• Employer paid parking & professional membership fees;
• Smartphone allowance;
• Health, dental, life and disability insurance;
• Employee assistance program; and
• Annual health and fitness allowance.

Qualified candidates who are interested in this position should send a covering letter and resume by Friday, July 6, 2018 to:

Tara Randell
Director of Professional Talent
Cox & Palmer
Suite 1100
1959 Upper Water Street,
Halifax, NS B3J 3N2
Direct (902) 491-4453
trandell@coxandpalmer.com

Volunteer and Pro Bono

We're Recruiting Volunteers - The Blue Beach Fossil Museum Society is seeking you!     

Do you have skills in: 

  • Law – charity and non-profit;
  • Business – management and prosperity goals; or 
  • Marketing – promotion and networking?  

Become part of a legacy to evolution: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QtBCL4DSs4s

If you like to volunteer and want to become part of an awesome legacy, join our team to help create the Blue Beach Paleo-Centre at world class fossil site Blue Beach, NS. Only 30 minutes from Halifax (near Hantsport)

Blue Beach is quickly becoming one of Nova Scotia's top rated beaches to visit. The Blue Beach fossil collection contains the oldest footprints on the Planet Earth! These 350 million year old discoveries, and others from this location shed light on one of the most important and vexing puzzles of evolution – the transition from water to land, from fish to amphibian. Already, world renown vertebrate/invertebrate/trackway experts, from Cambridge University UK, Harvard University, New Mexico, Canada, are focusing on the Blue Beach collection and scientific papers are now being published!

Join our team to create a spectacular tourist attraction destined to be a fun, educational learning centre for school groups, visitors, and fossil enthusiasts from around the world!

Our Vision: Perched on the beautiful cliffs overlooking the Minas Basin/Bay of Fundy, the Paleo-Centre  will represent a new, exciting brand in the world of science museums. The uniqueness of the project is that it features not only one of the greatest chapters in animal evolution, but also its bold innovations in museum displays and more – including:

  • evolutionary 3D art and 7D holographic laser projections
  • amphitheater hosting science/geological videos
  • a variety of dynamic educational/interactive displays
  • interactive paleolab/geological workshops
  • a paleo/geo/science store & a paleo-healthy snack bar
  • trails through old growth forests, beside freshwater/saltwater marshes and a look-off atop the cliffs viewing the fossils shoreline and the fastest/highest tides in the world
  • monuments of giant fish up to 50 feet. and others early land creatures
  • as well as cabinets 'full' of priceless fossils

For more information contact: bbfossils@xplornet.com or call: (902)790-9541  

Sonja E. Wood  (BBFMS Director) 

The Blue Beach Fossil Museum Society Canadian Registered non-profit (Charity Tax #: 809093628RR0001)
127 Blue Beach Rd.Hantsport, Nova Scotia, B0P 1P0 Canada
http://www.bluebeachfossilmuseum.com
Bay of Fundy Tourism Partners

Evolution's greatest mystery!

The Community Justice Society's mission is to provide a community-based restorative justice process, offering meaningful ways to repair the harms caused by youth and adult crime, and restoring positive relationships among youth and adults in conflict with the law, victims of youth and adult crime, and our community.  The board will suppport the work of the Community Justice Society and provide mission-based leadership and strategic governance.  New Board members for 2018 will be elected at the June 15th, 2018 Annual Genaral Meeting of the Society.  Interested Applicants can apply and/or receive further information by calling (902) 424-5473.

Are you a lawyer or law student in Nova Scotia and seeking to improve access to justice for disenfranchised communities? If so, consider registering for some of reachAbility’s pro bono opportunities! We know that calling any member of the legal profession busy is an understatement, so all our programs ask for a maximum of a single hour annually. On top of that, our volunteer opportunities all count towards the NSBS’ Continued Professional Development Requirement for lawyers. 

Who We Are:

reachAbility is a registered charity dedicated to equalizing the playing field for people facing barriers. It was started in 2000 by award-winning executive, Tova Sherman. By 2008, it received the Nova Scotia Human Rights Award from the NSHRC and by 2016, it received official thanks and recognition from the Government of Nova Scotia. In addition to our legal services, we also offer free employment counselling services to our clients, as well as self-awareness and recreational programs.

Legal Referral Service:

Our Legal Referral Service connects persons inclusive of disabilities with a volunteer lawyer for a free one-hour consultation in Nova Scotia. Our legal services team works hard to ensure that the process is as simple as possible for both the client and the lawyer. All that is required of our volunteer lawyers is to perform a brief conflict of interest check and the consultation itself. We take care of matching the area of law with your expertise as well as distilling the legal issues and questions from our clients’ problems. While the referrals can be in any area of law and does not have to relate to disability, they also do not place any long-term obligations on the volunteer. After the one-hour consultation is finished, the lawyer and client are free to make an arrangement depending on the needs of both parties.

Community Outreach Initiative:

A Community Outreach Initiative is a free, ninety-minute information session on a legal topic relevant to persons with disabilities. These talks give those with disabilities a unique opportunity to learn more about legal issues that matter to them, and to participate in a discussion on that topic with a legal expert. Typically, members of the legal community prepare very basic legal tips and information on an area of law. Recent examples include talks on disability rights, mental health and the law, as well as the rights and responsibilities of tenants and landlords.

Form Filling Clinic:

reachAbility has partnered with the Halifax YMCA, Veith House and Chebucto Connections to provide a weekly form filling clinic for anyone who requires assistance for forms such as criminal record pardons, lease agreements and more. We are seeking volunteer law students who would be interested in resuming these clinics during the summer months.

Registering with reachAbility is as easy as sending us your email signature and the areas of law you practice. If you are interested or would like more information, please contact Nathan Kaulback at legal@reachability.org or at (902) 429-5875. You can also visit our website at www.reachability.org

Lymphoma Canada is a Canadian charitable organization with a mission to empower lymphoma patients and the lymphoma community through education, support and research. Lymphoma Canada provides educational materials and hosts forums and conferences on Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). We also provide patient and caregiver support, advocate on behalf of patients for timely access to new treatments, and fund Canadian research. Lymphoma Canada resources are reviewed by our Scientific Advisory Board (comprised of Canadian researchers and clinicians), Nursing Advisory Board and/or Patient & Family Advisory Committee.

Description of Position

The Board of Directors provides leadership and support to the organization by committing to excellence in governance and organizational health. The 12 member volunteer board is comprised of a team of leaders with combined expertise and experience in governance, financial management, human resource management, law, business management, marketing, fundraising and lymphoma. We currently have an opening for someone with legal experience. All members of the Board have a passion for volunteering and for making a difference in the lives of those touched by lymphoma.

Responsibilities

Directors generally meet five times a year; meetings are conducted on-line and once or twice a year, a 1.5-day in-person meeting takes place in the Toronto area. Board members are also required to participate on one or more of the following standing committees: Finance & Audit, Governance, HR, and/or Patient Support & Research. For more information about Lymphoma Canada, the important work we do, and how you can make a difference, visit www.lymphoma.ca. Interested candidates from Atlantic Canada or Alberta are invited to submit a cover letter and recent resume, including applicable experience, to the attention of the Board Selection Committee, care of shilpa@lymphoma.ca.

Upcoming Events
Event Date: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 - 13:30

Down and Out or Up and About?: What's considered permissible activity on sick leave

Tuesday, May 15, 2018, 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm EDT 

Moderators

Carissa Tanzola Vice-Chair, Workplace Safety and Insurance Appeals Tribunal

Speakers

Kelly Nychka Union Counsel, Chivers Carpenter

Dr. Perry Sirota Clinical and Forensic Psychologist

Danny Bernstein Employer Counsel, Roper Greyell

Issues

In the minds of many, an employee taking a sick day or on sick leave is in bed surrounded by piles of tissues or possibly trying to rest despite great pain, unable to do much of anything. Is this a legitimate conception of what an employee on sick leave should be doing though? In fact, many healthcare professionals view socializing and "getting-out" as important aspects of treatment or recovery for individuals with mental illnesses. In this session experts will answer the pressing question: What can employees do while on sick leave? They will also discuss methods of preventing sick leave abuse while respecting employees' privacy and human rights. How sick is sick?

  • What constitutes illness for the purposes of entitlement to sick leave and sick pay? Must an employee be completely unable to work?
  • Can sick days be used "prospectively" in regard to mental health, i.e. can they be used to rest or engage in "self-care" in hopes of preventing a greater mental health problem? What if problems in the workplace, such as impending discipline or interpersonal conflict, are the cause of the stress or mental health concern?
  • Can employees take sick days for relatively minor "self-inflicted" conditions, like hangovers? Do employees have an obligation to refrain from personal activities that may reasonably result in illness or injury that would prevent them from working as scheduled?
  • Given the new amendments to the Ontario Employment Standards Act which prohibit employers from requiring medical certificates from employees taking personal emergency leave, are employees in Ontario now free to take two paid days off – and eight unpaid days off – for any reason as long as they designate those days "personal emergency leave?"

Going to the doctor, caring for others, working, and going on vacation:

  • Can employees use paid sick leave to attend medical appointments or is there an obligation to schedule medical appointments outside of work hours? Does it matter whether the appointment is a routine medical appointment, e.g. an annual physical, or an appointment required for treatment of an illness or disability?
  • Can employees use paid sick leave to care for sick children or other family members?
  • Can employees work at their own businesses or for another employer while on sick leave? If they can do some type of work, shouldn't they be doing some sort of accommodated work for the employer that has granted sick leave?
  • What is acceptable activity for an employee on leave for mental health issues? How should employers respond to reports of such employees engaging in social or recreational activities or travelling? Are Facebook pictures of an employee smiling and laughing evidence that the employee is not depressed?

Preventing abuse and disciplining fraudsters

  • In what circumstances have arbitrators found it reasonable for employers to suspect sick leave abuse and demand information beyond what is usually required to support such leave? When has requesting more information to substantiate the legitimacy of an employee's sick leave been held to be unreasonable or even harassment?
  • When, is it appropriate for an employer to conduct covert surveillance of an employee suspected of sick leave fraud?
  • Does abuse of sick leave always justify discharge? Or are there circumstances in which damage to the trust underlying the employment relationship can be repaired?
Event Date: Tuesday, May 22, 2018 - 15:00

This course is available via 45 minute long webinar with live chat for $35 plus HST at the date and time shown, and other dates and times. You must register at least two days before the live webinar start time.

The course is also available via free on demand 29 minute long pre-recorded podcast or video.

Topics:

  • What are issues in negotiations?
  • What are positions in negotiations?
  • What are interests in negotiations?
  • What are the relationships between issues, positions, and interests in negotiations?
  • How is using the issues, positions, interests framework helpful for negotiators?
  • Issue identification is useful for agenda development.
  • Position identification is useful for making comparisons between possible positions.
  • Interest or motive identification is helpful for making comparisons between possible positions.
  • Could more than one position be proposed for a single issue?
  • The identification of a common currency when comparing dissimilar items.
  • What might ponies and jerseys have in common?
  • Should agreement be reached on individual issues before agreement is reached on all issues?
  • How are interests both causes of negotiations and used to measure negotiations?
  • Using common measurements to assess interests and positions.
  • Considering multiple issues to be related by interests.
  • Understanding negotiations as involving series of questions.
  • Use of issue checklists
  • Use of interest based issue identification.
  • Use of time limited proposals to eliminate some issues.
  • Elaborate positions as involving multiple questions and answers.
  • Presentation of elaborate positions.
  • Initial proposals involving multiple issues in conventional negotiations.
  • Issue identification in novel negotiations.
  • Whether to seek agreement on positions on particular issues one at a time or to seek agreement on an entire package after identifying all of the relevant issues.
  • Issue separation and linking.
  • Commitment timing and conditional commitment.
  • Interests as cause of, and in preparation for, negotiation.
  • Appeal to interests when proposed positions unacceptable.
  • Compatible interests as satisfiable by several positions.
  • Inquiry to identify unidentified positions satisfying compatible interests.
  • The possibility of incompatible interests.
  • Unsatisfying agreements.
  • The possibility of agreement when one side perceives that the other side did better.
  • Agreement as consequence of unattractive alternatives.
  • The use of the question, why?, for interest identification.
  • Limits to asking, why?.
Event Date: Wednesday, May 23, 2018 - 16:00 to 17:00

Presentation to the Youth of Hope Blooms, focusing on Youth Criminal Justice, Human Rights, and Consent

Featuring Speakers: Joshua Bearden, Nova Scotia Legal Aid, and Angela Simmonds, Nova Scotia Legal Aid

About Hope Blooms: Featured on Dragons’ Den, Hope Blooms is a community garden founded in 2008 by Jessie Jollymore, Community Dietician, in the inner city of the North End of Halifax. Through their own actions and hard work, youth learn how to grow food, produce and successfully market value-added products, grow a small social enterprise from the ground up, and give back to their community.

APRIL & MAY ARE BRING-A-BUDDY MONTHS

In April & May consider bringing a non-member buddy to a Section Meeting.  Sections provide opportunities for lawyers to network and to keep ahead of current developments within the profession. The Nova Scotia Branch wants to show non-members what they’re missing!! Your buddy must register and pay the registration fee as well – spread the word so as not to miss out on this opportunity!

Event Date: Thursday, May 24, 2018 - 15:00

This course is available via 50 minute long webinar with live chat for $35 plus HST at the date and time shown, and other dates and times. You must register at least two days before the live webinar start time.

The course is also available via free on demand 36 minute long pre-recorded podcast or video.

Topics:

  • How might the word, “interests”, need clarification so negotiators may achieve better results while negotiating?
  • “objective interests” as what is good for a party.
  • “subjective interests” as what a party wants.
  • What ethical problem arises due to the distinction?
  • Who decides?
  • The Model code of conduct concern.
  • Instrumental concerns for future dealings, consequences, and relations.
  • Positions as publicly stated and as what is desired.
  • The problem when a stater believes their position is their interest.
  • Failure to inquire as to multiple interests sought to be furthered through a stated position.
  • Delicacy of questioning whether another’s position furthers their interests.
  • The general prescription to look to interests when dealing with undesireable positions.
  • When stated position is known to be closely related to a particular world-view or value system.
  • The utility of curiosity.
  • Are values, needs, and the sacred different than interests?
  • World-views or religious views or unmet human needs such as identity, recognition, and security.
  • Interests anything anyone cares about during negotiation?
  • Utility of these subsets or different concepts.
  • Problem solving for unmet human needs.
  • Dialogue for sacred values.
  • Offering symbolic concessions.
  • Avoiding offering material trade-offs for sacred values.
  • Sacred values as open textured.
  • Separating sacredness from the material.
  • Relative weighting of competing sacred values.
  • Single behaviours relating to multiple moral prescriptions.
  • Sincere recognition as removing an impediment to negotiation.
  • Difficulties of sincere recognition.
  • Having an ally from the other side.
  • Apology for others’ acts.
  • Negotiations also occur within groups.
  • Counsel shouldn’t act in areas outside their experience.
  • Quantification of interests for purpose of trade-off.
  • Situations of common currency.
  • Situations where common currency must be determined.
  • Techniques for assessing trade-offs.
  • When groupings affect relative values of individual items grouped.
  • Difficulties of quantifying intangibles.
  • Human subjectivity.
  • Limits of analysis.
  • Tools as clarification rather than as quantification.
  • Human unwillingness or inability to analyze.
  • Problem if lawyers does the valuing for the client.
  • Non-monetary values.
  • Limits of appealing to interests.
  • Compatible interests and incompatible positions.
  • Concession of interests for agreement on a position.
  • Limiting the negotiation to issues on which agreement may be possible, or interests that do not contradict.
Event Date: Friday, May 25, 2018 - 19:00

Mahone Bay Launch of “There’s Something in the Water: Environmental Racism in Indigenous and Black Communities”.

Date: May 25, 2018

Starts: 7:00 pm

Ends: 9:30 pm

Location: Mahone Bay Centre, Ralph Hennigar Room

Address: 45 School Street, Mahone Bay, NS 

Join author Dr. Ingrid Waldron as she launches There’s Something in the Water: Environmental Racism in Indigenous & Black Communities. This book is an expose of the environmental injustice practiced by the government of Nova Scotia against it’s marginalized communities. Ingrid R. G. Waldron is an associate professor in the Faculty of Health at Dalhousie University and the Director of the Environmental Noxiousness, Racial Inequities & Community Health Project (The ENRICH Project).

This is a free event - everyone is welcome. Books will be available for purchase.Co-sponsored by Council of Canadians - South Shore Chapter.

More about: “There’s Something in the Water”: https://fernwoodpublishing.ca/book/there8217s-something-in-the-water  

Event Date: Tuesday, May 29, 2018 - 15:00

This course is available via 35 minute long webinar with live chat for $35 plus HST at the date and time shown, and other dates and times. You must register at least two days before the live webinar start time.

The course is also available via free on demand 24 minute long pre-recorded podcast or video.

Topics:

  • What are alternatives?
  • How do they differ from options?
  • How do alternatives affect positive bargaining ranges and negative bargaining ranges?
  • What are BATNA, EATNA, ZOPA, and SOPA?
  • When do alternatives set ranges and when do they set thresholds?
  • How are alternatives and options compared?
Event Date: Wednesday, May 30, 2018 - 15:00

This course is available via 35 minute long webinar with live chat for $35 plus HST at the date and time shown, and other dates and times. You must register at least two days before the live webinar start time.

The course is also available via free on demand 18 minute long pre-recorded podcast or video.

Topics:

  • What is the role of precise quantification in alternatives and objectives?
  • What is the role of subjective perception in alternatives and options?
  • How do you learn about the other side’s alternatives?
  • What are the benefits and detriments of credibly committing to a position that you believe the other side will view as slightly better for them than their alternative.
  • When should you disclose your alternative?
Event Date: Thursday, May 31, 2018 - 13:00

Too much to do and not enough time to do it? Good organization and time management skills are crucial elements of Too much to do and not enough time to do it? Good organization and time management skills are crucial elements of a successful and satisfying legal career, and also critical skills required to meet important ethical obligations. If your typical work day consists of jumping from one “almost overdue” project to another, then it's time to learn some proven time management techniques. Designed to address lawyers’ unique organizational and time challenges, this fun, 90 minute webinar with lawyer and leading legal productivity expert Meg Spencer Dixon will offer dozens of practical tips and techniques to help you:

  • start and keep working
  • limit interruptions
  • delegate effectively
  • stay motivated
  • avoid habits that lead to errors and omissions; and,
  • eliminate procrastination

Applying even a few of the techniques taught will make a significant difference in your work and your life. Register today and learn how to increase your productivity and achieve your goals on a daily basis!

Live webinar with chat includes 30 day replay. This program features real-time audio of the presenter with synchronized presentation slides, and a chat feature that allows for live Q & A. 

Event Date: Thursday, May 31, 2018 - 13:30

Dealing with Difficult People: Bullying bosses, sensitive employees, and other challenging personalities

Thursday, May 31, 2018, 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm EDT 

Moderators

Judith Begley Mediator/Investigator, Begley Landry

Speakers

Heather Jensen Union Counsel, Plaxton Jensen

Dr. Sahar Bhaloo Clinical Psychologist, Dr. Bot & Associates

David Law Employer Counsel, Law at Work

Issues

Employers and unions alike accept that there is a high cost to low morale – that friction among co-workers lowers productivity – and recognize that the potential legal liability for workplace bullying is increasing. As a result, workplace parties are paying closer attention than ever to workplace behaviours that cause conflict, discontent, or complaints. But how many complaints are simply unfounded? Are some employees just too sensitive? In this session a panel of experts will address these questions, as well as the following:

Difficult personalities/patterns of behaviour:

  • What "personalities" or patterns of behaviour consistently create problems in the workplace? What is the difference between a "personality" and person's pattern of behaviour? Can difficult people change if given a chance?
  • When will behaviours maladapted to the workplace meet the definition of a "mental disability" and trigger the duty to accommodate under human rights legislation? Are personality disorders legally-recognized disabilities under human rights legislation? What other disabilities may cause difficult or disruptive workplace behaviour?
  • Does the employer always have a duty to inquire as to whether difficult behaviours are related to a mental disability before disciplining employees?
  • Are good "social skills," or "being a good team player," bona fide occupational requirements (BFORs)? Will employers find it easier to establish that it would cause them "undue hardship" in cases involving employees' disabilities that impair their ability to work with others?

The bullying boss:

  • How can you distinguish between a difficult, demanding boss and those abusing their authority? How do you draw the line between bullying and legitimate management actions?
  • Must an employer investigate every harassment complaint directed at a supervisor or manager, or can some complaints be summarily dismissed on the basis that the employee is simply unhappy with being managed?
  • What legal protections do employees have if they are being bullied by a superior? What policies and procedures need to be in place to make these legal protections effective? For example, what should be done to protect employees from reprisal?

Sensitive employees:

  • What is the difference, if any, between employees who "just can't take criticism" or simply dislike certain management styles and employees who are especially sensitive to criticism or other management actions because of a mental disability?
  • Do employers have a duty to be more sensitive in dealing with individuals with mental disorders that make them especially sensitive to criticism, or is taking direction and criticism a bona fide occupational requirement?
  • Would changing an employee's supervisor amount to undue hardship for the employer where the supervisor is a source of distress for an employee, even if a reasonable person would not consider the supervisor's behaviour to be harassment?
Event Date: Thursday, May 31, 2018 - 15:00

This course is available via 35 minute long webinar with live chat for $35 plus HST at the date and time shown, and other dates and times. You must register at least two days before the live webinar start time.

The course is also available via free on demand 18 minute long pre-recorded podcast or video.Topics:

  • How do you keep your alternative secret?
  • Can you influence perceptions of alternatives?
  • Can you affect alternatives?
  • How are alternatives related to negotiator skill?
Event Date: Monday, June 4, 2018 - 15:00

This course is available via 45 minute long webinar with live chat for $35 plus HST at the date and time shown, and other dates and times. You must register at least two days before the live webinar start time.

The course is also available via free on demand 29 minute long pre-recorded podcast or video.Topics:

  • What are issues in negotiations?
  • What are positions in negotiations?
  • What are interests in negotiations?
  • What are the relationships between issues, positions, and interests in negotiations?
  • How is using the issues, positions, interests framework helpful for negotiators?
  • Issue identification is useful for agenda development.
  • Position identification is useful for making comparisons between possible positions.
  • Interest or motive identification is helpful for making comparisons between possible positions.
  • Could more than one position be proposed for a single issue?
  • The identification of a common currency when comparing dissimilar items.
  • What might ponies and jerseys have in common?
  • Should agreement be reached on individual issues before agreement is reached on all issues?
  • How are interests both causes of negotiations and used to measure negotiations?
  • Using common measurements to assess interests and positions.
  • Considering multiple issues to be related by interests.
  • Understanding negotiations as involving series of questions.
  • Use of issue checklists
  • Use of interest based issue identification.
  • Use of time limited proposals to eliminate some issues.
  • Elaborate positions as involving multiple questions and answers.
  • Presentation of elaborate positions.
  • Initial proposals involving multiple issues in conventional negotiations.
  • Issue identification in novel negotiations.
  • Whether to seek agreement on positions on particular issues one at a time or to seek agreement on an entire package after identifying all of the relevant issues.
  • Issue separation and linking.
  • Commitment timing and conditional commitment.
  • Interests as cause of, and in preparation for, negotiation.
  • Appeal to interests when proposed positions unacceptable.
  • Compatible interests as satisfiable by several positions.
  • Inquiry to identify unidentified positions satisfying compatible interests.
  • The possibility of incompatible interests.
  • Unsatisfying agreements.
  • The possibility of agreement when one side perceives that the other side did better.
  • Agreement as consequence of unattractive alternatives.
  • The use of the question, why?, for interest identification.
  • Limits to asking, why?.
Event Date: Wednesday, June 6, 2018 - 12:00 to 13:00

Spousal Sponsorship Applications – Recent Developments and Best Practices (followed by a Q and A)

Speaker: Lori Hill, North Star Immigration Law Inc.

 

Event Date: Wednesday, June 6, 2018 - 15:00

This course is available via 50 minute long webinar with live chat for $35 plus HST at the date and time shown, and other dates and times. You must register at least two days before the live webinar start time.

The course is also available via free on demand 36 minute long pre-recorded podcast or video.

Topics:

  • How might the word, “interests”, need clarification so negotiators may achieve better results while negotiating?
  • “objective interests” as what is good for a party.
  • “subjective interests” as what a party wants.
  • What ethical problem arises due to the distinction?
  • Who decides?
  • The Model code of conduct concern.
  • Instrumental concerns for future dealings, consequences, and relations.
  • Positions as publicly stated and as what is desired.
  • The problem when a stater believes their position is their interest.
  • Failure to inquire as to multiple interests sought to be furthered through a stated position.
  • Delicacy of questioning whether another’s position furthers their interests.
  • The general prescription to look to interests when dealing with undesireable positions.
  • When stated position is known to be closely related to a particular world-view or value system.
  • The utility of curiosity.
  • Are values, needs, and the sacred different than interests?
  • World-views or religious views or unmet human needs such as identity, recognition, and security.
  • Interests anything anyone cares about during negotiation?
  • Utility of these subsets or different concepts.
  • Problem solving for unmet human needs.
  • Dialogue for sacred values.
  • Offering symbolic concessions.
  • Avoiding offering material trade-offs for sacred values.
  • Sacred values as open textured.
  • Separating sacredness from the material.
  • Relative weighting of competing sacred values.
  • Single behaviours relating to multiple moral prescriptions.
  • Sincere recognition as removing an impediment to negotiation.
  • Difficulties of sincere recognition.
  • Having an ally from the other side.
  • Apology for others’ acts.
  • Negotiations also occur within groups.
  • Counsel shouldn’t act in areas outside their experience.
  • Quantification of interests for purpose of trade-off.
  • Situations of common currency.
  • Situations where common currency must be determined.
  • Techniques for assessing trade-offs.
  • When groupings affect relative values of individual items grouped.
  • Difficulties of quantifying intangibles.
  • Human subjectivity.
  • Limits of analysis.
  • Tools as clarification rather than as quantification.
  • Human unwillingness or inability to analyze.
  • Problem if lawyers does the valuing for the client.
  • Non-monetary values.
  • Limits of appealing to interests.
  • Compatible interests and incompatible positions.
  • Concession of interests for agreement on a position.
  • Limiting the negotiation to issues on which agreement may be possible, or interests that do not contradict.
Event Date: Wednesday, June 6, 2018 - 17:30

The Nova Scotia Barristers’ Society invites all lawyers in Nova Scotia to an evening celebrating women’s leadership in the legal profession.

Women – Strength in Leadership: Remembering Dara Gordon, QC

Wednesday, June 6, 2018
5:30 to 7:30 pm
Delta Halifax, Bluenose Ballroom
1990 Barrington Street, Halifax

Join us for an evening of snacks, refreshments and candid conversation with:

Justice Cindy Bourgeois, Nova Scotia Court of Appeal
Justice Christa Brothers, Supreme Court of Nova Scotia
Judge Ronda van der Hoek, Provincial Court of Nova Scotia

Space is limited! Please RSVP by May 30, 2018, by email to jwillwerth@nsbs.org.

This annual event is generously supported by McInnes Cooper.

Remembering Dara L. Gordon QC
Through the strength of her leadership and as a highly regarded lawyer, Dara Gordon QC made many contributions to her country, her province and her profession. Following graduation from Dalhousie Law School in 1979, she advised government bodies and corporations on major financing and infrastructure projects. She represented Nova Scotia in its complex federal negotiations on the sharing of offshore resource revenues, and was lead counsel for the Government of Canada in the development and operation of the Confederation Bridge. She also served as a director of the Nova Scotia Law Foundation, the Nova Scotia Gaming Corporation and the Atlantic Lottery Corporation. 

As an entrepreneur, Dara’s most notable business endeavour was her family’s acclaimed Benjamin Bridge winery in the Annapolis Valley. She was a member of the CBA, the Canadian Council for Public Private Partnerships and, prior to her untimely death in 2009, McInnes Cooper’s Board of Directors.

Dara was an extraordinary woman of style and grace, with an abundance of wisdom and compassion. She positively influenced the outcomes of many legal issues, the success of the firms and businesses where she practised, and the careers of many lawyers in Nova Scotia. She always challenged us to be our best.

 

Event Date: Thursday, June 7, 2018 - 08:30 to 09:30

Women's Forum Annual Breakfast with the Bench

Speakers: The Honourable Justice Ann Smith and The Honourable Judge Amy Sakalauskas

 

Event Date: Thursday, June 7, 2018 - 13:00

At some point or another, even non-criminal lawyers are likely to receive a phone call from a client (or friend or relative) who has been arrested, or who has a family member who has been arrested. “What should I do?” they will ask. What you say, and what happens in the next few minutes and hours - whether dealing with a minor or serious matter - can have a profound impact on the client’s future. This new, 90 minute webinar will arm you with sufficient knowledge to answer that question intelligently and competently. The course is designed for non-criminal law practitioners and new lawyers considering criminal defence practice. Although you may ultimately refer the client to another lawyer, what you learn in this program will enable you to collect essential information, and provide important advice about do’s and don’ts during detention, arrest and custody. Experienced criminal defence counsel James Morton will provide an overview of the most frequent reasons a person may be arrested or detained, suggest best practices for counseling your client, advise what rights to preserve and how, and address what comes next. Don’t miss this unique how-to reference guide - from the first minute your telephone rings until the dust settles.

Live webinar with chat includes 30 day replay. This program features real-time audio of the presenter with synchronized presentation slides, and a chat feature that allows for live Q & A. 

Event Date: Thursday, June 7, 2018 - 17:30 to 19:30

TACO NIGHT!

Antojo Tacos + Tequila, Halifax NS

http://antojo.ca/

There is no cost to register for this event. Attendees can purchase food and beverages from the Antojo menu. 

Event Date: Monday, June 11, 2018 - 15:00

This course is available via 35 minute long webinar with live chat for $35 plus HST at the date and time shown, and other dates and times. You must register at least two days before the live webinar start time.

The course is also available via free on demand 24 minute long pre-recorded podcast or video.

Topics:

  • What are alternatives?
  • How do they differ from options?
  • How do alternatives affect positive bargaining ranges and negative bargaining ranges?
  • What are BATNA, EATNA, ZOPA, and SOPA?
  • When do alternatives set ranges and when do they set thresholds?
  • How are alternatives and options compared?
Event Date: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 - 15:00

This course is available via 35 minute long webinar with live chat for $35 plus HST at the date and time shown, and other dates and times. You must register at least two days before the live webinar start time.

The course is also available via free on demand 18 minute long pre-recorded podcast or video.

Topics:

  • What is the role of precise quantification in alternatives and objectives?
  • What is the role of subjective perception in alternatives and options?
  • How do you learn about the other side’s alternatives?
  • What are the benefits and detriments of credibly committing to a position that you believe the other side will view as slightly better for them than their alternative.
  • When should you disclose your alternative?
Event Date: Thursday, June 14, 2018 - 13:00

Today’s clients demand that lawyers understand how to value a business – whether in relation to a merger or acquisition, shareholder dispute, or an estates or family law matter. The more you understand about business valuation, the better you’ll be able to use your financial understanding to your client’s advantage during negotiations or litigation. This all new, 90 minute webinar will help demystify business valuation for the average practitioner. In simple, easy-to-understand language, and using realistic examples, CPA, MBA Joseph Novello will explore reasons to value a business, provide practical tips based on which party you’re representing, and demonstrate commonly accepted valuation methods. You’ll learn the pros and cons of each method, what to watch out for, and how to formulate effective inquiries. By the end of the program, you’ll have the knowledge and confidence you need to work with and communicate with financial advisors, and represent your client's interests effectively. Joe’s simple, proven approach to financial education has helped thousands of lawyers throughout North America better serve their clients – now let him help you!

Live webinar with chat includes 30 day replay. This program features real-time audio of the presenter with synchronized presentation slides, and a chat feature that allows for live Q & A.

Event Date: Friday, June 15, 2018 - 15:00

This course is available via 35 minute long webinar with live chat for $35 plus HST at the date and time shown, and other dates and times. You must register at least two days before the live webinar start time.

The course is also available via free on demand 18 minute long pre-recorded podcast or video.

Topics:

  • How do you keep your alternative secret?
  • Can you influence perceptions of alternatives?
  • Can you affect alternatives?
  • How are alternatives related to negotiator skill?
Event Date: Saturday, June 16, 2018 - 08:30 to 12:15

All lawyers, articled clerks and non-practising members are invited to attend the Society's 2018 Annual Meeting and Professional Development Program, which will take place on Saturday, June 16 in Halifax. The Annual Meeting begins at 8:30 am, followed by two keynote sessions, then an educational component from 10:30 am to 12:15 pm.

Saturday, June 16, 2018
8:30 am to 12:15 pm

Schulich School of Law, Dalhousie University
6061 University Ave., Halifax

PRINTABLE PDF PROGRAM

To confirm your attendance at the 2018 Annual Meeting and Professional Development Program, RSVP to AnnualMeeting@nsbs.org, indicating the two educational sessions you plan to attend.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM
This year's Professional Development Program provides a range of helpful and practical sessions for lawyers. Attendees can choose two consecutive 45-minute sessions from the following options (see the program at the link above for session descriptions and the schedule): 

  • TRC – How to put the calls to action to work in your practice; Josie McKinney, Nova Scotia Public Prosecution Service
  • Protecting your client’s privacy; David Fraser, McInnes Cooper
  • Opening a new law firm; Jennifer Pink, NSBS Legal Services Support Manager and Rosalie Francis, R. Francis Law
  • NSBS Diversity Standard / Guidelines for trans* and gender-variant clients; Susanne Litke, Dalhousie Legal Aid Service; and Jane Willwerth, NSBS Officer, Equity & Access

KEYNOTE PRESENTATIONS

Client panel: What do we want from our lawyers and the justice system?
This panel discussion will include insights from clients who will help lawyers understand what they need and want in their representation. Speakers include Rodney Small of Common Good Solutions; Paul Elliott from Moose Cree First Nation; Sheree Conlon QC of Stewart McKelvey, NSBS Council member and Co-Chair of the Society’s Gender Equity Committee; and Alisha Brown-Fagan, Co-Chair of the Nova Scotia Legal Aid Commission’s Equity and Racial Diversity Committee and executive member of the Canadian Association of Black Lawyers, Nova Scotia chapter. 

Community Engagement and Increasing Diversity on the Bench; Two Pillars to Enhance Access to Justice
The Society is pleased to welcome the Honourable J. Michael MacDonald, Chief Justice of Nova Scotia and Chief Justice of the Nova Scotia Court of Appeal. In his keynote address, Chief Justice MacDonald will discuss recent community engagement efforts, and initiatives to enhance diversity on the Bench and access to justice for marginalized communities.    

If you have any questions about the 2018 NSBS Annual Meeting, please contact the Society at 902 422 1491 or AnnualMeeting@nsbs.org.

Event Date: Tuesday, June 19, 2018 - 13:30

Indigenous Traditions: Understanding spiritual practices and approaches to dispute resolution

Tuesday, June 19, 2018, 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm EDT 

Moderators

Karen Drake Associate Professor, Osgoode Hall Law School, York University; Commissioner, Ontario Human Rights Commission

Speakers

TBA Speakers TBA

Marisha Roman Lawyer; Adjudicator, Child and Family Services Review Board/Custody Review Board

Issues

The work of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and debates around the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls highlight the importance of rethinking the ways in which non-Indigenous Canadians engage with Indigenous peoples across the country. In this session, expert panelists will discuss how the workplace and related dispute resolution processes can be adapted to respect Indigenous practices and build trusting relationships.

  • How can workplace parties ensure that values and norms of Indigenous communities and persons are respected in the workplace and in dispute resolution processes? How can employers and unions create a climate of respect?
  • What can unions learn in better representing Indigenous persons?
  • What are some Indigenous spiritual practices/beliefs that may require workplace accommodation?
  • What is the meaning/significance of Indigenous elements that might be incorporated into non-Indigenous dispute resolution processes, such as sitting in circle and opening with prayer? What is the most respectful way of incorporating these elements?
  • What steps should be taken to find the space and place for the voices of Indigenous women?
Event Date: Wednesday, June 20, 2018 - 12:00 to 13:00

The New Adult Capacity and Decision-making Act: 6 Months In

Speakers: Tammy Wohler, Nova Scotia Legal Aid, and Adriana Meloni, Nova Scotia Department of Justice

Event Date: Thursday, June 21, 2018 - 13:00

If you’re a member of a fitness club or a recreational sports league, or have a school-aged child, liability waivers are a fact of life. Questions about the validity and enforceability of waivers are common - both from activity operators seeking to protect themselves from negligence claims, and from patrons who executed a waiver and were subsequently injured. Challenges to waivers, and the defence of claims involving the interpretation of waivers, require careful analysis of a number of variables.This new, 90 minute webinar is designed to introduce general practitioners, corporate counsel, and other nonpersonal injury specialists to this discrete area of practice. Topics include requirements of a valid liability waiver, challenges to enforceability or validity of waivers, and developing issues in the law of waivers, including waivers executed on behalf of children. The course will provide a broad perspective of relevant cases and statutes across Canada.You’ll leave with a better understanding of the purpose of waivers, what participants are being asked to give up when they sign a waiver, and tools available to recreational providers to insulate themselves from, and defend, personal injury claims. This knowledge will assist practitioners in helping clients to better manage the legal risks that are part of their everyday lives. Register early and save!

Live webinar with chat includes 30 day replay. This program features real-time audio of the presenter with synchronized presentation slides, and a chat feature that allows for live Q & A.

Event Date: Thursday, June 21, 2018 - 17:30 to 20:00

An Evening with the Nova Scotia Labour Board

Speakers: Karen Hollett, Chair, Nova Scotia Labour Board, and Diana Hartley, Chief Administrator, Nova Scotia Labour Board

Event Date: Thursday, July 12, 2018 - 13:30

At the Breaking Point: The growing problem of workplace stress and burnout, and what to do about it

Thursday, July 12, 2018, 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm EDT 

Moderators

Colin Johnston Arbitrator/Mediator

Speakers

Zaheer Lakhani Employer Counsel, Bandhu Lakhani Campea

Andrea Zappavigna Union Counsel, HHBG Lawyers

Issues

Stress, like other workplace hazards, can adversely affect employees' health, making them more susceptible to both physical and mental illnesses; it can also cause employees to become dissatisfied and quit their jobs. In light of these facts, employers, unions, and regulators are increasingly recognizing workplace stress as both a serious occupational health and safety hazard and a significant labour relations concern. In this session, a leading expert on workplace stress will join experienced labour lawyers to address occupational health and safety, human rights, and labour relations issues that arise as a result of workplace stress. Questions to be addressed include:

Defining stress and its causes:

  • How do medical and psychological authorities define stress, overwork, and burnout?
  • How significant is workplace stress as a health hazard? Is workplace stress really killing people?
  • What are the common causes of workplace stress, overwork, and burnout? To what degree is workplace stress caused by systemic issues, such as understaffing and the general organization and governance of workplaces? To what degree is it more of an "individual issue" dependent on individual employees' abilities to cope with stress?

Reducing stress, and preventing overwork and burnout:

  • Is the legal perspective on workplace stress in Canada changing? Are adjudicators now more likely to recognize workplace stress as a serious workplace health and safety issue? Will they award damages to employees who have suffered stress as a result of unreasonable management decisions?
  • What are some signs that workers are experiencing unhealthy levels of stress? What is the appropriate response when managers, supervisors, union representatives, or health and safety committee members notice these signs?
  • What are the best practices for preventing or reducing stress, overwork, and burnout in the workplace? What role is there for the National Standard of Canada for Psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace?

Stress leave, statements made in the heat of the moment, and accommodation:

  • Is "stress" a disability that must be accommodated? Does the legal definition of disability require a diagnosis of a recognized medical or psychological disorder? Does stress qualify as an illness for the purposes of taking sick leave?
  • What role does stress play in adjudicators' assessments of statements, such as insubordinate comments and hasty resignations, made in the heat of the moment?
  • Where accommodation necessitates a reduction in stress, what accommodations are helpful? What types of accommodation measures would constitute undue hardship to the employer? Are employers required to change performance standards or reduce workloads for stressed employees? Are they required to transfer an employee or a supervisor where a supervisor is a source of stress for an employee?
Event Date: Thursday, July 19, 2018 - 13:00

Every legal argument involves the arrangement of the facts to suit your legal purpose. We are storytellers, but unlike the fiction writer, we have ethical restraints. We can’t make up facts. And we often don’t get to write the ending - that’s for the judge or jury. But we can still use the storyteller’s tricks and techniques to our advantage. We can present our story and its characters in a way that rings true. We can make our client the hero of the story, so our audience consciously or subconsciously roots for them to succeed. We can indicate what we want to the court, without insisting upon it. Piece by piece, we can bring our listener into the world according to our client. If we can do that, our chances of winning multiply.

That’s why it’s worthwhile to consider the essential elements of storytelling: plot, character, and style. The same tools that make a good fiction writer can also make you a successful lawyer. In this exciting new program, William Bernhardt, lawyer and New York Times bestselling author of more than forty books, shares those secrets. Bernhardt demonstrates the storytelling techniques that have been used successfully in both criminal and civil cases, and shows you how to apply these same strategies to your own writing to advance your client’s narrative. Don’t miss this extraordinary opportunity to benefit from Bernhardt’s lifetime of learning.

Live webinar with chat includes 30 day replay. This program features real-time audio of the presenter with synchronized presentation slides, and a chat feature that allows for live Q & A.

Event Date: Thursday, July 26, 2018 - 13:30

The Latest Word on Last Chance Agreements: How to draft them, when to use them, and whether arbitrators will enforce them

Thursday, July 26, 2018, 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm EDT 

Moderators

Douglas Ruck Arbitrator/Mediator

Speakers

TBA Union Counsel TBA

Jamie Eddy Employer Counsel,Cox & Palmer

Dr. Charl Els Psychiatrist; Clinical Professor, Department of Psychiatry, University of Alberta

Issues

Last chance agreements (LCAs) are often used when an employee has been, or is about to be discharged for reasons related to attendance or a substance use disorder. While arbitrators are reluctant to interfere with freely negotiated resolutions between workplace parties, they recognize that the terms of an LCA and any adverse action taken based on it must comply with the duty to accommodate under human rights legislation. In this session, seasoned labour lawyers and a medical expert will explore when LCAs may be appropriate, what terms may be included, and the circumstances in which LCAs will be set aside. Issues to be addressed include:

  • In what circumstances are LCAs appropriate?
  • Can/should LCAs deal with both culpable and non-culpable conduct?
  • What provisions are usually included in an LCA? How can/should the terms be individualized to address an employee's specific needs?
  • In cases involving substance use disorders, what terms should be included in an LCA? Are conditions requiring an employee to abstain from alcohol or drug use appropriate or helpful? Is it discriminatory not to allow for relapses? Is random drug/alcohol testing permitted? Is a requirement to undergo psychological assessment or an independent medical examination discriminatory? Can/should LCAs require an employee to undergo rehabilitation treatment? If so, what treatment options should be considered? What type of aftercare may be appropriate?
  • Are employers entitled to medical updates or other information about counseling or treatment?
  • Can/should an LCA require an employee to substantiate any absence with a doctor's note?
  • Can an LCA impose a requirement not imposed on other employees, such as requiring that the employee's attendance equal or surpass the departmental average?
  • Is it permissible for an LCA to limit an arbitrator's jurisdiction to determining whether its terms have been violated, and preclude the arbitrator from determining whether the employer has met its duty to accommodate?
  • How much weight is given to an LCA at arbitration?
  • In what circumstances will LCAs be upheld as consistent with the employer's duty to accommodate to the point of undue hardship, and when will they be found unenforceable? Will an LCA ever be set aside if it includes a term that the employer has reached the point of undue hardship?
  • Does post-termination evidence of rehabilitation carry significant weight at arbitration? When is such evidence admissible?
  • If an employee in a safety-sensitive position breaches an LCA, must the employer consider accommodation in a non-safety sensitive position?
  • If an employer imposes an LCA and it subsequently becomes aware that the employee has a disability, is the LCA enforceable?
  • In what circumstances will arbitrators impose LCAs as a condition of reinstatement?
Event Date: Friday, August 10, 2018 (All day)

TRAINING SESSION AGENDA:

9:00 AM

REGISTRATION

9:30 AM(2 Hours)11:30 AM(1 Hour)

  • Introduction to the Canadian Immigration System (Foreign Workers)
  • Federal guidelines for foreign recruitment
  • The Employment Protection for Foreign Nationals Act
  • Exploring the point of view of Nova Scotia and other provinces over foreign recruitment
  • Canadian Permanent Residency & Citizenship options for foreign workers.

ETHICAL RESPONSIBILITY: (PROFESSIONALISM CONTENT)

  • Misrepresentation and consequences of misrepresentation.
  • Accommodating client’s requests ethically and following the guidelines imposed by the law.
  • Ethical matter arising from SASK and Foreign Workers Recruitment and Immigration Services Act.

12:30 PM

NETWORKING & LUNCH

 

1:30 PM(1H 30 Min)

  • NOC – National Occupational Classification
  • Authorization – Who may work in Canada
  • Visa, eTA, Permit
  • Work without a Permit

3:00 PM

REFRESHMENTS & GROUP DISCUSSION3:30 PM(1H 30Min)

  • LMIA – Labour Market Impact Assessment
  • Work without an LMIA under the international agreements and the Canadian interests
  • Work with an LMIA for low-wage or high-wage employees
  • Immigration and citizenship options for Temporary Workers

5:00 PM

ATTENDANCE & WRAP-UP

Event Date: Thursday, August 16, 2018 - 13:30

Chronic Pain: Medical and legal experts demystify the issues

Thursday, August 16, 2018, 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm EDT 

Moderators

Jon Chapnick Senior Advisor, Workplace Mental Health, University of British Columbia

Anne Gregory Legal & Legislative Representative, Canadian Union of Public Employees

Speakers

E. Murphy Fries Union Counsel, Koskie Glavin Gordon

Dr. Hillel Finestone Clinical Investigator, Bruyère Research Institute; Director of Stroke Rehabilitation Research, Bruyère Continuing Care; Physiatrist, Élisabeth Bruyère Hospital

Brian Wasyliw Employer Counsel, Sherrard Kuzz

Issues

With an estimated 1 in 5 Canadians suffering from some type of chronic pain, the condition is so prevalent that it cannot be ignored by workplace parties. Given the subjective nature of pain, sufferers can encounter barriers in obtaining an appropriate diagnosis and receiving adequate treatment of their symptoms. Indeed, since chronic pain is a non-evident condition that is frequently misunderstood, sufferers can often be stigmatized as malingerers. Unfortunately the pain they experience is very real, impacting all facets of their lives including work attendance, productivity, and career progression. Because employers and unions may not fully appreciate the challenges posed by chronic pain, they may encounter difficulties in identifying suitable accommodations for an episodic condition that does not follow a predictable course of recovery. In this session, experienced medical and legal practitioners will provide an overview of the condition and discuss its impacts on the workplace, including:

  • Understanding chronic pain: How is chronic pain defined? Is it an episodic condition or do symptoms tend to remain stable over time? What are some of the common physical and psychological impacts of chronic pain? What treatments are available to manage the condition?
  • Impact on the workplace: How does chronic pain impact attendance and work performance? Are there typical work restrictions or functional limitations that arise either from the condition itself or from the side-effects of common treatments?
  • Requesting medical information: Does the nature of the condition create any particular challenges in obtaining medical information for the purpose of validating absences and identifying suitable accommodations? How should employers tailor their requests for medical information to ensure that they receive adequate information? What information can an employer expect to receive in order to ensure that it can meet its duty to accommodate?
  • Providing suitable accommodations: What are some examples of appropriate accommodations for an employee who suffers from chronic pain? Are there any particular challenges that are frequently encountered in assessing whether an accommodation is suitable? Are there any other measures that employers and unions can take to support an employee with chronic pain?
Event Date: Tuesday, August 21, 2018 - 13:30

The Latest on Disability-Related Misconduct: What's changed since the Supreme Court's decision in Elk Valley?

Tuesday, August 21, 2018, 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm EDT

Moderators

Shana French Employer Counsel, Sherrard Kuzz

David Yazbeck Union Counsel, Raven, Cameron, Ballantyne & Yazbeck

Speakers 

Ronni Nordal Union Counsel, Nordal LeBlanc

Dan Bokenfohr Employer Counsel, McLennan Ross

Issues

The Supreme Court of Canada's decision in Stewart v. Elk Valley Coal Corporation, in which the majority upheld the dismissal of an employee who failed to disclose his addiction prior to a workplace accident, has been the subject of much debate and speculation among the labour community. It has been applied by courts, arbitrators, and human rights tribunals not only in cases involving substance use disorders, but also more broadly in cases involving issues such as the prima facie test for discrimination, the duty to accommodate, and the impact of zero tolerance policies. In this session, experienced counsel will explain how Elk Valley has altered the law relating to disability-related misconduct in the workplace, addressing issues such as:

  • Establishing discrimination: How has the majority decision clarified the test for establishing prima facie discrimination? Has Elk Valley altered the manner of assessing whether workplace misconduct is causally connected to a disability? Does an employee now have to establish that a disability was the proximate cause of the adverse treatment, and not simply a contributing factor? Are adjudicators requiring that medical evidence be provided to establish this connection?
  • Duty to accommodate: Will an employee's failure to disclose a substance use disorder, or other disability prior to a workplace accident or discipline-worthy event, displace an employee's entitlement to accommodation based on disability? Does it alter the employer's duty to inquire into an employee's health and possible need for accommodation?
  • Crafting workplace policies: Does Elk Valley provide any lessons in drafting workplace drug and alcohol policies? Has the majority view that zero tolerance policies are not per sediscriminatory been accepted by adjudicators? Will a zero tolerance policy alone be sufficient to provide cause for discipline or dismissal? What, if anything, must an employer establish aside from having a zero tolerance policy in order to justify discipline for disability-related misconduct? Must the employee establish in each case an incapacity to choose to comply with a self-disclosure policy, i.e. that the failure to self-disclose a substance use disorder is caused by denial that is due to addiction?
  • Impact of Elk Valley: How have adjudicators applied Elk Valley in practice? Has the decision been broadly applied, or has it been restricted to its particular facts? Has it resulted in reduced human rights protections for employees with substance use disorders or other disabilities?
Event Date: Thursday, September 13, 2018 - 08:30 to Friday, September 14, 2018 - 04:45

The 2018 bi-annual Legislative Drafting Conference will tackle one of the most pervasive challenges in modern legislation: complexity, beginning with its principal drivers in public policy. Why does our world generate legislative complexity? And how can legislation address this complexity intelligibly, coherently and effectively? Conference sessions will also focus on examples of today’s complexity challenges in international trading relationships, cannabis de-criminalization and the interaction of state law with indigenous legal traditions. Other sessions will focus on pragmatic drafting solutions to particular facets of these challenges, such as interjurisdictional coherence, resolving policy blockages, drafting for clients with limited policy-resources and achieving legislative coherence over time. The conference will include a wide range of speakers from Canada, the UK and beyond.

Event Date: Thursday, September 13, 2018 - 13:30

Reefer Reality: Experts discuss burning questions about legalized cannabis

Thursday, September 13, 2018, 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm EDT 

Moderators

Mihad Fahmy Union Counsel

Jon Chapnick Senior Advisor, Workplace Mental Health, University of British Columbia

Speakers

Twila Reid Employer Counsel, Stewart McKelvey

Patrick Nugent Union Counsel, Nugent Law Office

Dr. Nancy Carnide Post-Doctoral Fellow, Institute for Work and Health

Issues

With cannabis legalization set to come into effect this summer, employers and unions are preparing to respond to the challenges posed by the increased availability and consumption of what was formerly an illicit substance. While workplace impairment is not a new issue, cannabis presents some unique difficulties that are not present with alcohol. For example, there is currently no medical consensus on the safe limits for cannabis consumption or an objective measurement of impairment. Therefore, while legalization is not a licence to attend work under the influence, it does pose a variety of challenges for employers and unions as they seek to ensure workplace safety without infringing on the rights of employees.In this session, medical and legal experts will discuss the effects of cannabis, the challenges in assessing impairment, and common issues that arise in crafting workplace policies and rules. Issues to be addressed include:

  • Legal framework: What is the current legal framework regulating cannabis use? What other legislation aside from Bill C-45 regulates cannabis use?
  • Effects of cannabis use: How is cannabis normally ingested or consumed? How does it typically affect the body, both physically and psychologically? How long do these effects typically last? Can off-duty use impact on-duty performance? Is cannabis addictive or habit-forming?
  • Measuring impairment: Does consumption necessarily result in impairment? What are the symptoms of impairment? What are the challenges to determining whether a person is impaired? Is it possible for a layperson to reliably assess impairment? Are there any products currently available on the market that help in making this determination?
  • Crafting workplace policies: Are any changes required to existing workplace drug and alcohol policies? Are there any other common workplace policies that should also be reviewed? What elements should be included in a workplace policy dealing with cannabis use? In what circumstances, if any, can an employer adopt a zero-tolerance policy for use or possession?
  • Requiring disclosure: Can an employee be required to disclose off-duty recreational use of cannabis? What about off-duty medicinal use? Following the Supreme Court of Canada's decision in Stewart v. Elk Valley Coal Corporation, can an employee be required to disclose substance dependence prior to a work-related incident or else face dismissal without the benefit of accommodation?
  • Consumption in the workplace: Does legalization now mean that employees are entitled to consume cannabis in the workplace? Can employers prohibit use on their property or while attending offsite work events? Does the approach differ if dealing with medicinal use vs. recreational use?
Event Date: Tuesday, September 18, 2018 - 13:30

Leading Cases on Discharge and Discipline: Mastering the key principles, foundational cases, and current issues

Tuesday, September 18, 2018, 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm EDT 

Moderators

Andrew Tremayne Arbitrator/Mediator

Speakers

Shona Moore Union Counsel, Moore Edgar Lyster

Augustus Richardson Arbitrator/Mediator

Ashley Brown Employer Counsel, Sherrard Kuzz

Issues

This essential session will explore the seminal cases and fundamental principles that shape the disciplinary process in unionized workplaces, and discuss how they are being applied by arbitrators today. Join a seasoned arbitrator and labour lawyers to gain a better understanding of the key issues involved, including progressive discipline, the right to union representation, and aggravating and mitigating factors.

  • The just cause standard: When will employee action meet the "just cause" standard for discipline? Are there different approaches to just cause in different jurisdictions? Is a progressive discipline approach implicit in the just cause standard? Are zero-tolerance policies consistent with the just cause standard?
  • Culminating incident and prior record: What constitutes a "culminating incident," and when is an employer entitled to rely on an employee's adverse disciplinary record? When, if ever, can an employer rely on evidence relating to prior non-disciplinary incidents? Are employers ever entitled to adduce evidence of prior discipline, in the presence of a sunset clause?
  • Right to remain silent: What practical consequences may follow from an employee's failure to provide an explanation for apparent misconduct?
  • Union representation: What triggers the right to union representation? Is there an implied obligation on the employer to advise the employee of the right to union representation when calling a disciplinary meeting? Where the right is violated, is discipline automatically void?
  • Assessing discipline: What factors are generally seen as aggravating factors, and what factors are generally seen as mitigating factors? Which factors carry the most weight in assessing discipline?
  • Effect of disability: What approach do arbitrators take when a union asserts that an employee's misconduct can be explained as a consequence of his or her disability? Has the Supreme Court's decision in Elk Valley altered the manner of assessing whether workplace misconduct is connected to a disability?
  • Compensation in lieu of reinstatement: In what circumstances will arbitrators decline to reinstate an employee despite finding that discharge was not warranted?
Event Date: Wednesday, September 19, 2018 - 09:00 to Wednesday, October 10, 2018 - 09:00

Registration is open until the Friday before the Online Land Registration Act training program. Cost for this program is $650 plus HST and registrants have the first two weeks to review the materials and the final week to complete the assessment.

Lawyers participating in this program MUST have a working knowledge of property law. The review materials provided are not meant to teach the principles of property law but to assist you in reviewing for the assessment.

Register

Event Date: Thursday, September 20, 2018 - 13:00

Are you carrying a heavy case load, completing work at the last minute, plagued by constant interruptions, inundated with information, drowning in paper, overloaded by email, handling too much work yourself, or spending too much time at the office? In short, do you have too much to do and not enough time? Believe it or not, a lot of lawyers feel that way. You can get to the end of the day, after working hard, only to discover that you have not accomplished the priorities that you set out in the morning. But it doesn’t have to be that way!Taught by lawyer and noted international legal productivity consultant Irwin Karp, this highly practical webinar will give you the insights and tools you need to avoid time wasting activities, so you can make the most of your day. You’ll learn how to take control of your workload, manage your busy schedule, focus on your priorities, meet your deadlines, make your workday more productive, and make more time for the things most important to you. In short, you’ll learn how to get organized and get things done – with less stress! Register today and get started!

Live webinar with chat includes 30 day replay. This program features real-time audio of the presenter with synchronized presentation slides, and a chat feature that allows for live Q & A.

Event Date: Wednesday, November 14, 2018 - 09:00 to Wednesday, December 5, 2018 - 09:00

Registration is open until the Friday before the Online Land Registration Act training program. Cost for this program is $650 plus HST and registrants have the first two weeks to review the materials and the final week to complete the assessment.

Lawyers participating in this program MUST have a working knowledge of property law. The review materials provided are not meant to teach the principles of property law but to assist you in reviewing for the assessment.

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Event Date: Wednesday, June 6, 2018 (All day) to Wednesday, June 27, 2018 (All day)

Registration is open until the Friday before the Online Land Registration Act training program. Cost for this program is $650 plus HST and registrants have the first two weeks to review the materials and the final week to complete the assessment.

Lawyers participating in this program MUST have a working knowledge of property law. The review materials provided are not meant to teach the principles of property law but to assist you in reviewing for the assessment.

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Event Date: Thursday, July 5, 2018 - 02:00

Musculoskeletal disorders are the largest category of workplace injuries and account for the majority of personal injury claims. Knowing the real mechanism of a back or knee injury or what is and is not trauma-related is crucial to your success as an advocate. In plain-English, and with a sharp focus on the challenges you face, seasoned litigator, and law and anatomy professor Sam Hodge will explain the nuances of the spine and lower extremities in an easy to understand manner that will allow you to better evaluate or defend your case. Professor Hodge, will explain how diagnosis are made and the particulars of medical tests and surgical procedure from the unique perspective of a very successful litigator and teacher. You will:

  • Learn how injuries to the spine & knee really occur.
  • Learn about muscles, ligaments, tendons and fascia.
  • Find out the difference between a sprain and a strain.
  • Become comfortable with the anatomy of the musculoskeletal system.
  • Find out how x-rays, Ct-scans and MRIs work as you read actual film

Live webinar with chat includes 30 day replay. This program features real-time audio of the presenter with synchronized presentation slides, and a chat feature that allows for live Q & A. 

Event Date: Wednesday, August 22, 2018 - 14:00

This webcast will provide insights and promising practices of how legal professional can go beyond "pride" to celebrate LGBT+ people through the year, and create and maintain inclusive workplaces for LGBT+ people and their allies at all times. 

CCDI prides itself on providing engaging and interactive education. Attendees participating in this webcast will have the opportunity to ask questions during the question and answer session for which accreditation is sought. Additionally, attendees are engaged through a variety of interactive means - such as whiteboards and polling - to ensure active participation and challenge their understanding of the subject.

This course is available as a live webinar in both English (August 22) and French (August 23). The webinar will then be available for rebroadcast for those working for CCDI Employer Partners through CCDI's Knowledge Portal.Licensees working for one of CCDI's Employer Partners are able to watch the recorded version of this webcast through our Knowledge Portal. Attendees viewing the content in this form are encouraged to send follow up questions to the presenters through an email address provided as part of the recording.

Register for this event here: http://ccdi.ca/event-calendar/ccdi-webinar-creating-inclusive-workplaces-for-lgbtplus-people-legal/

Event Date: Thursday, July 19, 2018 (All day) to Friday, July 20, 2018 (All day)

This 2-day workshop will teach the basics of Collaborative Practice: How to work in interdisciplinary teams to help separating couples reach agreement. In the Collaborative process, Collaborative Lawyers act as legal advisors while facilitating an interest-based negotiation. The Collaborative lawyers work on a team which can include other collaboratively trained experts in the field of mental health, finance and child development The lawyers remain the facilitators of the negotiation towards a legal settlement. The other collaborative professionals play an important role in helping the client’s achieve settlement. The Mental Health Professional is a registered mental health practitioner who helps the parties deal with the emotions that underlie the separation process, work out parenting arrangements and improve the separating couples' communication. The mental health professional has the parties’ consent to provide input to the other members of the interdisciplinary team. In some cases, the mental health professional meets with the parties alone and brings feedback to the lawyers. In other cases, the mental health professional participates with the parties and the other Collaborative professionals in meetings. The Child Specialist may become involved when parties are finding it hard to make parenting decisions. The Child Specialist is a neutral professional who gives voice to the children’s interests and helps the parents develop a workable parenting plan that addresses these interests. The Child Specialist works with the parents and the mental health professional to create a parenting plan and is integrated with the whole team to provide input into the negotiation, as appropriate. The Financial Professional is a neutral expert retained to assist both parties in gathering financial information and to explain financial information in an unbiased manner. The financial provides a balanced perspective on financial issues and can help parties develop realistic budgets and projections, examine tax implications and demonstrate the long-term consequences of the settlement options. While the lawyers primarily handle the negotiation which leads to the final, legal settlement, the involvement of the other professionals, working as a team, completes the interdisciplinary process and assists the parties in reaching more creative and lasting solutions. It also tends to save money, as each professional is working with his or her strongest skill-set to help the separating couple move forward in the negotiation.

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