Society news
2016 Wickwire Lecture available for viewing online: "The Ethics of Sexual Assault Lawyering"

Printer-friendly version

The 26th Annual F.B. Wickwire Memorial Lecture in Professional Responsibility and Legal Ethics took place on Thursday, December 1 at the Schulich School of Law, co-presented by the Nova Scotia Barristers’ Society.

This year’s topic was “The Ethics of Sexual Assault Lawyering,” with Elaine Craig, Associate Professor of Law, Schulich School of Law at Dalhousie University.     

A video of the lecture is now available for viewing online.

***Please note: This video contains explicit language and graphic discussion of gender-based violence that could be disruptive for some viewers. Viewer discretion is advised.***

In her lecture, Professor Craig discussed the ethical duties and obligations placed on criminal defence lawyers and Crown attorneys in the context of sexual assault cases. Relying on data gathered from interviews, trial transcripts and law firm websites, she examined some of the ways in which the attitudes and practices of lawyers contribute to the harms experienced by sexual assault complainants.

Professor Craig teaches and researches in the areas of constitutional law, evidence law, law and sexuality, feminist legal theory and queer legal theory. She has written extensively on the treatment of complainants in sexual assault trials. Her first book, Troubling Sex, was published in 2012 by UBC Press and her next book focuses on the treatment of complainants in sexual assault trials.

Find out more about the Wickwire Memorial Lecture series on the Schulich School of Law website under Public Lectures, where you can also watch videos of past lectures.

Frederick B. (Ted) Wickwire was educated in Halifax and practised in the field of corporate and commercial law with a special interest in property rights, as senior partner in the firm of MacInnes Wilson Flinn Wickwire. In 1977, he was appointed the first Chairman of the Nova Scotia Legal Aid Commission. Mr. Wickwire worked tirelessly to ensure that Nova Scotia lawyers maintained a level of uncompromised professionalism. To this end, he served as Society president and chairman of the Legal Ethics Committee, and oversaw creation of the original handbook on ethics and professional conduct.